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Chicago State University (Department of Nursing)




On behalf of the faculty, I would like to extend a warm welcome to our webpage. Thank you for considering Chicago State University, Department of Nursing, to pursue a career in nursing. You are about to embark on a challenging, exciting and rewarding career choice. Our faculty is committed to helping you excel academically and assist you in achieving your personal and professional goals, while at Chicago State University.

The webpage contains important information regarding the admission process, and academic policies and procedures that will guide you as you consider applying to our nursing program.

HISTORY OF THE NURSING PROGRAM

In response to recommendations made by the Illinois Implementation Commission on Nursing (IICON) to increase the number of baccalaureate nurse graduates in Illinois, Chicago State University conducted a feasibility study that led to the initiation of the Division of Nursing at the University. In March of 1971, a director and assistant director were appointed to develop a baccalaureate nursing program. Approval of the program was obtained from the Illinois Department of Registration and Education and the Illinois Board of Governors in 1972. During the Summer of 1973, the first dean was appointed and in 1974, the Division became a College.

The period between 1975 and 1980 were years of development and expansion. The program achieved an initial eight-year accreditation from the National League for Nursing in 1981, and received re-accreditation in 1989, 1997 and 2005. In 1992, the College of Nursing and the College of Allied Health were merged into the College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions that later became the current College of Health Sciences as we enter the 21st century.

MISSION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF NURSING

The Department of Nursing adheres to the mission of the University and the College of Health Sciences, which is to provide access to higher education for residents of the region, and the state and beyond.

The mission of the Department of Nursing is to provide educational experiences that empower learners, promote competence in the area of professional nursing, strengthen the capacity for employment in a variety of clinical practice settings within the healthcare community, and develop a sense of civic responsibility.

Through high quality and creative instruction, the faculty strives to provide an environment that is conducive to learning, stimulates intellectual inquiry, and encourages personal and professional growth. The faculty creates an environment that fosters scholarship, and a desire for lifelong learning.

The nursing faculty is sensitive to the unique characteristics of learners as these relate to issues of access, retention, and graduation. The faculty strives to prepare graduates who are able to func- tion as compassionate, caring professionals. By providing a high quality program, the faculty endeavors to prepare leaders to meet the changing and comprehensive health needs of the community. Both faculty and learners attempt to create and strengthen community linkages in order to develop collaborative research and service projects that will enhance the health status of the community.

PHILOSOPHY

The faculty of the Department of Nursing believes that persons are self-determined, bio- psycho-social-spiritual-cultural beings who possess inherent worth and dignity, who are capable of growth, and worthy of respect. Throughout the life cycle, persons interact with their internal and external environments and can alter their environments to meet changing needs.

Persons have basic human needs, which are essential to survival. The issues which persons encounter and the manner in which they meet their needs reflect their culture, capabilities, values, and beliefs. Society consists of diverse groups united by common sociocultural characteristics and human needs such as security, nurturance, affection, and communication. The family, the basic unit of society, is the setting in which person’s initial socialization occurs and values and patterns of communication are learned. The values and practices learned in the family are shared and transmitted from one generation to another.



School name:Chicago State UniversityDepartment of Nursing
Address:9501 South King Drive, Business and Health Sciences (BHS) Building, Room 200A
Zip & city:IL 60628-1598 Illinois
Phone:(773) 995-3992
Web:http://www.csu.edu/Nursing/
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Department of Nursing Nursing School Location







Department of Nursing Courses


BRIDGE I
A course to improve the success of students entering the professional nursing sequence. Development of critical thinking skills for critical judgments and in problem solving.

BRIDGE II
A required course for any student who earns a grade of D or F in a nursing course at the sophomore level. Review of course content on an individualized basis in order to promote critical thinking and application to simulated nurse-patient situations

BRIDGE III
A required course for any student who earns a grade of D or F in a nursing course or who fails an end-of-course examination at the junior level.

BRIDGE IV
A required course for any student who earns a grade of D or F in a nursing course or who fails an end-of-course or end-of-level examination at the senior level.

ENRICHMENT
Enhancement of student learning throughout the nursing program to meet level competencies. Course is taken for five semesters beginning spring semester sophomore level.

INTRODUCTION TO NURSING
Professional practice of nursing with an emphasis on the nursing process and critical thinking. Client advocacy, documentation, ethics, health care systems, history, legal implications, nursing theories, and professional nursing roles.

NURSING PROCESS IN THE ADMINISTRATION OF PHARMACOLOGIC AGENTS
Introduction to basic pharmacology. Emphasis on the development of critical thinking skills in the administration of pharmacologic agents.

PSYCHOSOCIAL CONCEPTS
Introduction to the interactive nature of the nurse-client relationship with a major emphasis on the development of therapeutic communication skills, therapeutic use of self, and identification of coping/defense mechanisms. Development of skills in conducting a culturally sensitive mental health assessment and applying theory based therapeutic nursing interventions to commonly seen client care situations related to anger/hostility, anxiety, depression, and alterations in self concept. The impact of the family, group, and community on clients across the life cycle. A primary focus is on primary and secondary prevention.

HEALTH CARE ETHICS
Exploration of ethical theory as a framework for professional judgment and decision making. Examination of ethical dilemmas frequently encountered in the health professions.

NURSING PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
Altered physiological and pathologic aspect of human disease across the life span. Critical thinking in the process of integrating elements of pathophysiology and nursing in the management of illness and health promotion.

INTRODUCTION TO PROFESSIONAL NURSING FOR LICENSED PRACTICAL NURSES (LPNs)
Introduction to the philosophy and conceptual framework of the professional nursing program at Chicago State University. Concepts germane to current health care trends are explored as they relate to the role of the professional nurse. Examination of concepts such as health promotion, communication, therapeutic nursing interventions, critical thinking, and teaching-learning.

SPIRITUAL CARE
Dimensions of spiritual nursing care to persons throughout the life span along the health illness continuum.

FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING LECTURE AND CLINICAL
Nursing skills, health assessment techniques, and critical thinking in the laboratory and selected community settings. Introduction to the process of decision-making as it relates to application of the nursing process.

HEALTH PROMOTION
Health promotion and illness prevention across the life span for individuals, families, and communities. Exploration of concepts such as alternative health strategies, environment, health, exercise, nutrition counseling, screening, and wellness.

HEALTH ASSESSMENT LECTURE AND CLINICAL
The nursing process and the role of the professional nurse in relation to health assessment. Selected methods of inquiry and investigation in gathering necessary physiological, psychological, cultural, and spiritual data. Students are required to perform a complete health assessment. Additional course fee.

HIV IN PEOPLE OF COLOR
Impact of HIV on minority populations. Examination of psychosocial issues, access to treatment, economic issues and demographics, including special populations such as teenagers, elders and pregnant women.

ADULT HEALTH NURSING I LECTURE AND CLINICAL
Application of medical/surgical nursing concepts and skills to young through middle-aged adult clients using the nursing process and critical thinking skills. Emphasis on the promotion and maintenance of physiological and psychosocial integrity and prevention of illness in a variety of community-based health care settings. Additional course fee.

MENTAL HEALTH NURSING LECTURE AND CLINICAL
Secondary and tertiary care to individuals and groups of clients with mental disorders in acute and community health care settings across the lifespan. Critical thinking, the nursing process, communication, group theory, and culture. Exploration of current research and public policy. Additional course fee.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR THE RN STUDENT
Development of a professional portfolio. Review of skills necessary to be successful in a baccalaureate degree program. Professional socialization by exploring professional goals.

HEALTH PROMOTION FOR REGISTERED NURSES
The identification and implementation of health promotion strategies for individuals, families, and community wellness.

NURSING LEADERSHIP/MANAGEMENT THEORY
Utilization of the nursing process, principles of management, leadership, organizational structure, and change in mobilizing resources to accomplish optimum health care delivery to clients (individuals, families, groups, communities) at any point along the health-illness continuum throughout the life cycle.

TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONAL NURSING
Introduction to professional nursing, the philosophy, and conceptual framework of Chicago State University. Examination of concepts, theories, and issues in professional education and practice, building on previous knowledge from the humanities, sciences, and nursing. Examination of nursing theory and concepts including the nursing process, teaching-learning, managed care, alternative health modalities, disease prevention, health promotion, research, ethics, and personal values in relation to the current health care environment.

ADULT HEALTH NURSING II LECTURE AND CLINICAL
Application of complex medical/surgical nursing concepts and skills to middle-aged through older adults. Critical thinking about the maintenance and restoration of physiological integrity of middle-aged through older clients. Emphasis on the care of clients with acute, chronic, and rehabilitative health care needs in a variety of community-based health care settings. Additional course fee.

NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS LECTURE AND CLINICAL
Focus on using the nursing process in the care of well, acutely ill, and chronically ill infants, children, and adolescents. Clinical experiences in clinics, emergency rooms, in-patient units, and other community-based facilities. Promotion and maintenance of wellness in pediatric clients. Additional course fee.

CLINICAL INQUIRY
Skills and knowledge to promote the development of a nursing research consumer. Introduction to methods of scientific inquiry such as steps of the research process, methods of critiquing research findings and applying the results to nursing practice in a variety of settings.

SPECIAL TOPICS IN NURSING
Selected topics of current interest in the field of nursing.

CLINICAL NURSING I LECTURE AND CLINICAL
Care of clients along the life cycle experiencing chronic and complex health problems in a variety of settings.

COMMUNITY SERVICE DEVELOPMENT
Development and implementation of a community-based health project. Identification of a population with a specific health need and implementation and evaluation of health promotion strategies to improve health related outcomes.

HEALTH POLICY
Introduction to the components and function of health care systems. Emphasis on the U.S. health care system, but approaches to health care in other countries are discussed. Critical examination of health care systems. Attention given to the roles of health care professionals as they interact with health care systems.

NURSING CARE OF THE DEVELOPING FAMILY LECTURE AND CLINICAL
Holistic integration of major concepts and theories used in the care of developing/expanding families from diverse cultures. Application of the nursing process, critical thinking, and problem solving for families during childbirth through health promotion, health maintenance, and health restoration. Additional course fee.

COMMUNITY BASED CARE OF FAMILIES, GROUPS, AND POPULATIONS LECTURE AND CLINICAL
Application of concepts from nursing and public health in the area of populations and communities. Use of core public health functions in developing collaborative partnerships with health care professionals, institutions, local governments, and community organizations. Application of the nursing process using leadership, scientific methods, critical thinking, and public health concepts in the care of populations and communities. Additional course fee.

NCLEX PREPARATION
Preparation for the National Council Licensure Examination - Registered Nurse. Includes content review, test-taking strategies, and personal preparation. Course will no longer be taught for students entering the University Fall, 2007 and thereafter.

CLINICAL NURSING II
Application of the concepts of holistic care and caring to the community as client. Introduction to the nursing process in conjunction with public/community health concepts, scientific methods, and critical thinking.

NURSING LEADERSHIP/MANAGEMENT CLINICAL /FIELD
Basic leadership and management principles for effective management of client care. Sixteen hours per week for six weeks. Skills in providing care for a group of clients, managing the health care environment, managing resources for care, and supervising other care-givers while operating effectively within a changing political health care organizations.

NURSING SEMINAR
Exploration of issues and trends in nursing research, education, and practice in a rapidly changing health care system and society. Course will no longer be taught for students entering the University Fall, 2007 and thereafter.

INDEPENDENT STUDY AND SPECIAL PROBLEMS
Designed for independent research and study of special nursing/health problems.

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