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Deaconess College of Nursing




Deaconess College of Nursing (DCN) was established for the purpose of educating individuals for lifelong practice in the profession of nursing. The College currently offers two programs in nursing education: a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Program and an Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN) Program with two levels of entry and exit. The BSN program offers two options; the traditional 4-year on-campus option and an on-campus or online option for RNs wishing to complete their BSN degree. The ASN program also offers two options. The ASN with PN component offers non-traditional students the opportunity to receive their ASN degree online. These students may elect to take the practical nursing licensure exam at the completion of half of the program. There is also an opportunity for LPNs to bridge toward their associates degree through both the on-campus or online options.

General education provides the foundation for the nursing major and continued learning in all educational programs. The addition of both clnical and non-clinical nursing courses in each program prepares graduates for practice at differing levels of experience and responsibility from entry to the nursing profession through the baccalaureate level.

The BSN Degree Program provides graduates with experiences necessary for professional practice in a variety of health care settings and clinical arenas. Experiences in clinical care nursing, leadership roles, and community health settings define the excellence of baccalaureate education at DCN. DCN is committed to career mobility within the profession of nursing. The ASN Degree Program prepares graduates to practice as registered nurses in selected health care arenas. The online ASN option incorporates a one-year practical nurse component, which further facilitates career mobility.

DCN believes that all qualified students deserve the opportunity to develop to their greatest potential. The addition of online options expands the learning opportunities to incorporate wider geographic areas and more nursing concentrated scheduling.

MISSION
Deaconess College of Nursing, owned and operated by DeVry Inc., has as its mission the provision of quality and innovative health care education programs in cost-effective and consumer-oriented practice environments. The College offers programs with a strong historical foundation, broad general education background, and extensive clinical practice that culminate in compassionate and clinically proficient graduates. The College is committed to fostering personal growth, career mobility, community service, and leadership among health care professionals.

PURPOSES
1. Provide educational programs that prepare graduates for professional and compassionate practice in a variety of health care settings entailing different degrees of competency and responsibility.
2. Provide learners with curricula and teaching modalities that develop written and oral communication skills, promote critical thinking and judgement, enhance the appreciation of cultural diversity in society, support the holistic and spiritual natue of the individual, enrich the individual student’s general educational foundation, and provide the basic skills necessary for lifelong learning.
3. Encourage commitment to personal and professional development, extra-curricular activities, service to the community, and civic and political responsibilities.
4. Honor the spiritual and historical foundations provided by the Deaconess Sisters and the association with the UnitedChurch of Christ in the provision of educational programs.
5. Maintain a collegiate environment that is safe, evidences mutual accountability, responsibility, and freedom of inquiry to stimulate intellectual growth among all constituents, and that provides the necessary structure and resources to continue to fulfill the mission.
6. Attract academically able students of all ages, races, and backgrounds and ensure the necessary services that will enable them to succeed.
7. Attract and retain academically and experientially prepared faculty and staff who facilitate student learning and contribute to professional and community activities.
8. Collaborate with administration and professional staff of Forest Park Hospital to promote evidencebased practice that enhances quality health care delivery.

PHILOSOPHY

The philosophy, affirmed by the faculty, is consistent with the Deaconess College of Nursing mission, which is to provide educational programs in nursing in an environment of mutual commitment and accountability among students, faculty, administration, and staff. Through this philosophy, the faculty expresses its commitment to excellence in the profession of nursing and quality education. The academic programs are based on the faculty’s beliefs about PERSON, HEALTH, NURSING, ENVIRONMENT, TEACHING-LEARNING, and NURSING EDUCATION.

We believe that the PERSON has intrinsic worth, is unique, and is created by and accountable to God. PERSON is used to designate individuals, families, aggregates, communities, and societies who are consumers of health care; and have developmental, cognitive, psychosocial, spiritual, cultural, and physiological dimensions. The PERSON interacts holistically within the environment, is an active collaborator in health are, and is responsible for individual life choices affecting health and health care issues. We believe HEALTH is a dynamic and holistic process resulting in a person’s perceived state-of-being. Health promotion, illness prevention, health maintenance and restoration and rehabilitative activities influence the person’s present level of wellness. Optimal health implies the achievement of the highest level of wellness throughout the life span, up to and including death.

We believe NURSING is a practice profession dedicated to providing quality health care to all persons. NURSING is the caring art of applying nursing knowledge. Nursing knowledge derives from theories and principles of nursing, arts, physical sciences, social sciences, and humanities. The caring art of NURSING implies the compassionate application of research-based knowledge, skills, and expert judgments rendered in a variety of health care settings. NURSING represents empowered individuals who function within established standards of the nursing profession, serve as change agents through social interaction and political activism, and move freely among nursing roles established to meet the everchanging needs of society.

We believe that ENVIRONMENT is the continuous interaction of processes internal and external to the person. Internal processes include stimuli from within the person or manifestations that are perceived from the surrounding space. External processes reflect the interaction of the person within the physical setting, and recognition of historical, demographic, technological, political, and cultural influences. All interactions among the person, health, and nursing occur within the limitless boundaries of environment.

We believe that TEACHING-LEARNING is the interactive process through which the learner integrates and applies concepts on cognitive, psychomotor and affective levels. Formal learning takes place in both traditional and cyberlearning environments. Through shared responsibility built on a reciprocal relationship, the learner evidences increased knowledge and growth relative to intellectual capabilities, prior experiences, readiness to learn, and motivation. The teacher guides and facilitates learning experiences with regard to the learner’s individual needs and abilities while facilitating the development of individual potential. The teacher utilizes a variety of teaching modalities that demonstrated shared responsibility and commitment to learning.

We believe NURSING EDUCATION promotes the social and intellectual growth of the learner. The pursuit of knowledge fosters an attitude that values the lifelong process of personal and professional development and social responsibility. The liberal educational curricular dimension provides the theoretical and experiential activities necessary for establishing a broad foundation for subsequent development. The addition of principles, concepts, and theories of nursing, generated by nursing research, culminates in a program of studies that enables the student to utilize a conceptual basis for nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on supporting the learner’s development in assuming roles consistent with the profession of nursing. In accordance with our beliefs supporting career mobility, Deaconess College of Nursing offers programs of nursing education that promote opportunities for individuals to enter and advance within the profession of nursing.The Associate of Science program provides the requisite knowledge and skills for nursing care in acute and longterm care settings where policies and procedures are specified and supportive guidance is available. The Associate of Science graduates are prepared to provide direct client care to individuals within the context of family and community relationships in accordance with their level of preparation. Although the primary focus is in meeting identified health care needs of the adult, the graduate facilitates adaptation of clients throughout the life span. The faculty believes in accepting an individual’s competency skill and providing the avenue for increasing knowledge and clinical experience for career mobility. General Infor Information mation Graduates with a Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing are prepared to practice comprehensive nursing care including health promotion, illness prevention, health maintenance and restoration, rehabilitation, and health teaching to individuals, families, aggregates, and communities in a variety of practice settings. The program of studies is directed toward the acquisition of knowledge and skills for the continued learning that is necessary to meet the challenges of a dynamic, evolving profession. The Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing offers opportunities for RNs for continued learning and career advancement.

HISTORY

The Deaconess tradition began in 19th Century Europe. Theodore Fliedner of Kaiserswerth, Germany established the first Deaconess Home and Hospital in 1836. Young, unmarried women were invited to join in the Deaconess Sisterhood to assist him with his mission. The word deaconess means “one who is devoted to of Nursing. By retaining the quality of nursing care associated with the Deaconess Sisters, these registered nurses have gone on to hold prestigious positions locally and nationally. Men joined the student body in the early 1970s. In 1983 Deaconess College of Nursing began offering a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. The transition from a school of nursing to a college allowed the student to have extensive nursing experience and sound general education courses culminating with a college degree. The Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN) degree program designed for licensed practical nurses graduated its first class in December 1990. At the start of the 21st century, Deaconess College of Nursing entered the world of distance education. In the fall of 2000 a new option was initiated to allow RNs to earn their bachelor’s degree online. In 2001 the College received approval to establish an online option for LPNs to earn an Associate of Science in Nursing degree. Approvals were also obtained to initiate an online option for individuals who desire an Associate of Science in Nursing service.” One of the early students was a young English woman, Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern professional nursing.

In 1889, an Evangelical pastor, concerned about the lack of health care in the St. Louis area, proposed establishing health care services based on the Kaiserswerth model. On March 18, 1889, 60 men and 10 women became the first members of The Evangelical Deaconess Society of St. Louis. The twofold purpose of the Society was to nurse the sick and exercise care for the aged, and to found and support a Deaconess home where Deaconesses could be educated and trained. The first Deaconess Hospital and Home was established near Union Station in 1889. Later that year Deaconess School of Nursing was founded. Within a short period of time, the School of Nursing established itself as a leader in nursing education. More than 500 Deaconess Sisters were consecrated to lifelong service. Many worked as missionaries throughout the world.

In 1943, the School of Nursing began admitting lay students. More than 2,000 women earned diplomas from Deaconess School of Nursing. By retaining the quality of nursing care associated with the Deaconess Sisters, these registered nurses have gone on to hold prestigious positions locally and nationally.

Men joined the student body in the early 1970s. In 1983 Deaconess College of Nursing began offering a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing. The transition from a school of nursing to a college allowed the student to have extensive nursing experience and sound general education courses culminating with a college degree. The Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN) degree program designed for licensed practical nurses graduated its first class in December 1990. At the start of the 21st century, Deaconess College of Nursing entered the world of distance education. In the fall of 2000 a new option was initiated to allow RNs to earn their bachelor’s degree online. In 2001 the College received approval to establish an online option for LPNs to earn an Associate of Science in Nursing degree. Approvals were also obtained to initiate an online option for individuals who desire an Associate of Science in Nursing degree, as well as the opportunity to sit for the Practical Nursing (LPN) licensure exam.

The traditions of quality care and education established by the Deaconess Sisters are evident in today’s students. Cloaked in the Deaconess tradition and armed with an excellent education, they are prepared to face the challenges of the 21st century.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING
The BSN Program incorporates general education and nursing coursework in a program of studies that provides knowledge and skills necessary for a lifetime of personal and professional growth. The goal of the general education component of the curriculum is to provide the student with a liberal educational foundation. This is accomplished through academic experiences that provide skills needed for advanced studies and lifelong learning. The freshman year emphasizes general education and prepares the student for the nursing major.

The nursing curriculum provides the opportunity for the student to acquire and demonstrate the professional nursing knowledge and skills necessary to assist clients to an optimal level of health. This is accomplished through an integration of theoretical nursing knowledge with essential clinical skills. The curriculum integrates moral, ethical, and legal principles with critical thinking, decision-making, leadership, and management techniques. An introductory course in nursing is offered in the second semester of the freshman year, and clinical practice experiences begin in the sophomore year.

The majority of nursing coursework occurs in the junior and senior years. Significant clinical practice hours are planned throughout the program to promote the proficiency in skills necessary for competent nursing practice. Students practice in a changing health care environment in acute and long-term care facilities as well as in community settings.

The emphasis on clinical experience, supported by theory from nursing and related disciplines, is the hallmark of the BSN curriculum at DCN. Theoretical and clinical nursing courses, nursing research, and issue courses provide the professional education base for the BSN degree. The BSN degree consists of a total of 132 credit hours: 69 credit hours in general education and 63 credit hours in the nursing major.

The RN with an associate degree or diploma may complete the BSN degree either on-campus or online. The online option allows the registered nurse students to complete the BSN degree with an educational format designed for adult learners. Advantages include the convenience of scheduling, focus on core content readily applicable to professional settings, and interaction with peers who share many similar professional experiences and values. Students identify preceptors in their region of residence to facilitate their clinical learning



Overview
Program Outcomes
BSN Curriculum Plan
General Education Requirements
Curriculum Plan for RN Students

Overview

The BSN Program incorporates general education and nursing coursework in a program of studies that provides knowledge and skills necessary for a lifetime of personal and professional growth. The goal of the general education component of the curriculum is to provide the student with a liberal educational foundation. This is accomplished through academic experiences that provide skills needed for advanced studies and lifelong learning. The freshman year emphasizes general education and prepares the student for the nursing major.

The nursing curriculum provides the opportunity for the student to acquire and demonstrate the professional nursing knowledge and skills necessary to assist clients to an optimal level of health. This is accomplished through an integration of theoretical nursing knowledge with essential clinical skills. The curriculum integrates moral, ethical, and legal principles with critical thinking, decision-making, leadership, and management techniques. An introductory course in nursing is offered in the second semester of the freshman year, and clinical practice experiences begin in the sophomore year.

The majority of nursing coursework occurs in the junior and senior years. Significant clinical practice hours are planned throughout the program to promote the proficiency in skills necessary for competent nursing practice. Students practice in a changing health care environment in acute and long-term care facilities as well as in community settings.

The emphasis on clinical experience, supported by theory from nursing and related disciplines, is the hallmark of the BSN curriculum at DCN. Theoretical and clinical nursing courses, nursing research, and issue courses provide the professional education base for the BSN degree. The BSN degree consists of a total of 132 credit hours: 69 credit hours in general education and 63 credit hours in the nursing major.

The RN with an associate degree or diploma may complete the BSN degree either on-campus or online. The online option allows the registered nurse students to complete the BSN degree with an educational format designed for adult learners. Advantages include the convenience of scheduling, focus on core content readily applicable to professional settings, and interaction with peers who share many similar professional experiences and values. Students identify preceptors in their region of residence to facilitate their clinical learning experiences.

PROGRAM OUTCOMES
The outcomes for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program are as follows:
1. Provides individualized comprehensive care, based on theories and principles of nursing and related disciplines, to individuals, families, aggregates, and communities from entry to the health care system through long-term planning.
2. Demonstrates leadership and collaboration with consumers and other health care providers in providing care and/or delegating responsibilities for health promotion, illness prevention, health reestoration and maintenance, and rehabilitative activities.
3. Communicates effectively with client populations and other health care providers in managing the collaborative health care of individuals, families, aggregates, and communities.
4. Integrates clinical judgement in professional decision-making and implementation of the nursing process.
5. Demonstrates responsibility for continued personal and professional development through enrollment in graduate education, continuing education programs, professional reading, participation in professional organizations, and servce to the community.
6. Implements professional nursing standards by practicing within the legal definitions of nursing practice acts and in accordance with the nursing code of ethics and ANA standards of practice.
7. Practices in established professional roles to provide cost-effective, quality health care to consumers in structures and unstructured settings.
8. Incorporates evidence - based practice in the provision of Professional nursing care to individuals, families, aggregates, and communities.



School name:Deaconess College of Nursing
Address:6150 Oakland Ave.
Zip & city:MO 63139 Missouri
Phone:1-800-942-4310
Web:http://www.chamberlain.edu/
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Deaconess College of Nursing Courses


INTRODUCTION TO NURSING This course introduces begining theoretical and practical foundations of professional practice based on the concepts of Person, Health, Nursing, and Environment. A laboratory component provides selected fundamental nursing skills as well as studey skills practice. SPECIAL TOPICS IN NURSING An independent study option available to qualified students upon request. Students will work with faculty or the Academic Dean on a selected course of study in nursing. PERSONAL AND VOCATIONAL CONCEPTS This course identifies the role of the licensed practical nurse in relationship to the professional nurse. Additional topics to be explored include a historical review of the nursing profession and current trends. Legal and ethical aspects of licensed practical nursing are applied to health care. Methods and techniques to promote student success, personal growth, and commitment to career mobility are identified. NURSING CONCEPTS The course provides an introduction to the basic concepts pertinent to practical nursing. Initial health concepts related to health promotion and restoration are explored with application to the elderly population. Selected psychosocial concepts such as anxiety and vulnerability are examined. Aspects of self-care related to elderly individuals are identified along with immobility concerns. NURSING SKILLS Acquisition of basic nursing skills is the focus of this course. Principles of health assessment for individuals that are performed by the licensed practical nurse are presented. Essential bedside nursing skills including vital signs, hygiene, sterile technique and other selected procedures are reviewed. NURSING CONCEPTS AND SKILLS The course provides an introduction to the basic concepts of licensed practical nursing, including basic nursing concepts as they relate to person, health, and environment. Essential components include communication techniques, teaching-learning and nursing process and development of critical thinking. Included also are basic nursing skills including health assessment. Medication calculation and initial knowledge required for medication administration as well as math skills beginning with decimals, fractions, and basic algebra computations are stressed in relation to preparing and administering medications safely. MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION This course focuses on medication calculation and the initial knowledge required to administer medications. Math skills beginning with decimals, fractions, and basic algebra computation as well as conversions of metric and household measurements are covered. Methods of determining correct dosages of medication in addition to basic and complex IV calculations are explored. Basic knowledge of pharmacology and how to prepare and administer medications safely are addressed. PHARMACOLOGY I Principles of pharmacology are identified in conjunction with the application of the nursing process. The role of the licensed practical nurse is emphasized. Selected drug classifications are introduced noting the effects, nursing considerations, and key drugs within each classification. Pharmacologic information from clinical courses is applied. NURSING LIFE SPAN I Essential nursing care for clients during the antepartal, labor, postpartal, and neonatal stages is presented. Fundamental principles related to pediatric nursing are addressed. The adult portion focuses on the elderly population, incoporating content concerning sensory, cognition, and mobility alterations. For all populations, the emphasis is on basic nursing care during the normal conditions and awareness of abnormal signs and symptoms. Clinical experiences in obstetrics, newborn, and well-child clinics are used. For the adult health portion of the course, emphasis is placed on the elderly population. NURSING LIFE SPAN II Expanding upon previous content, this course emphasizes physiologic alterations and psychosocial integrity of adults. Systems that are reviewed included oxygenation, elimination, nutrition, tissue perfusion, neurological function, and defencse mechanisms. Basic mental health principles and basic management concepts are addressed. Basic management concepts, caring for multiple patients, group communication, and team building skills are included. Clinical experiences occur in acute and long-term health care settings. MANAGEMENT CONCEPTS Within this course, the students begin to develop an awareness of concepts of team and managing multiple clients. Communication and team building skills are presented. Principles related to supervision of unlicensed personal long-term care facilities are addressed. Elements of the health care system are reviewed. FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING PRACTICE Content will focus on health promotion and rehabilitative aspects of clients care. Students will interact with individuals in the acquisition of fundamental skills of professional nursing. The nursing process is utilized as the student implements basic aspects of nursing practice in a variety of clinical settings as well as practicing psychomotor skills in a laboratory setting. ADULT NURSING This course focuses on adult health needs from wellness to acute care issues. All dimension of the client are explored in meeting shysiological health needs. Initial adult health concepts such as fluid and electrolytes, acid-base balance, pain and health promotion are addressed as well as a wide variety of specific medical and surgical health alterations. The clinical component provides opportunities to apply concepts of adult health care to clients with diverse levels of health in a variety of health care settings. HEALTH & WELLNESS This course will examine the principles and techniques of nursing assessment. Areas of focus include history taking, review of systems, physical examination techniques, and documentation of findings. A laboratory componenet provides the student the opportunity to utilize techniques of inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation to perform a complete health assessment. PEDIATRIC NURSING This course consists of clinical and classroom components. The clinical component will emphasize care of pediatric clients ranging from infancy through adolescence and will utilize the nursing process to promote wellness. The classroom component will focus on issues concerning growth and development, pathophysiology and promotion of wellness in clients. The student will practice in an acute care setting with pediatric clients. CLINICAL DECISION MAKING This theoretical course is designed to enhance critical thinking skills for students. The nursing process will provide a framework for application of learned skills to professional nursing. Students will interpret data, cluster information, and make decisions relative to clinical practice. Emphasis is placed on organization, priority setting, and integration of legal, ethical, moral standards governing professional nursing. MATERNAL/NEWBORN NURSING Maternal/newborn nursing content focuses on promoting optimal health in clients and families throughout the prenatal, intrapartal, and postpartal periods of the reproductive cycle. Nursing knowledge is applied to caring for all clients in the normal childbearing cycle. Professional, legal, and ethical issues are explored. Clinical application will be made with childbearing families from various socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds in acute care settings. ADULT HEALTH NURSING I The focus of this course is on adult clients and their families’ needs with emphasis on health maintenance and health restoration. Utilizing the nursing process, health alterations affecting selected life processes are discussed. Students are given the opportunity to continue their professional skill development as members of the health team in an acute care setting. MENTAL HEALTH NURSING The role of the associate degree nurse is explored in the provision of nursing care to individuals experiencing alteration in mental health. The nurse-client relationship, therapeutic milieu and interdisciplinary treatment team are viewed as vehicles through which the nurse communicates, assesses and intervenes to provide quality, cost-efficient nursing care and psychoeducation to individuals and their support person(s). Critical thinking skills are utilized to promote, maintain, and restore mental health within and across health settings. Ethical, legal and regulatory guidelines pertinent to the care of the mentally ill are examined. MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP CONCEPTS This course focuses on the management and leadership skills essential for organizing nursing care for a group of patients in an acute care setting. A strong emphasis is placed on the performance of the associate degree registered nurse as a team leader or charge nurse within a multidisciplinary health team. Concepts of management and leadership addressed include organizational structure, power, decision making, conflict, delegation, change, quality management and professionalism. In addition a comprehensive review of nursing facilitates the student’s progression the registered nurse role. The clinical component provides th student the opportunity to care for a group of clients while implementing the skills of a manager. MENTAL HEALTH NURSING Emphasis is on the dynamics of human behavior related to the individual’s ability to function in society. The course focuses on content relative to anxiety, self-concept, thought disorders, alterations in mood, addictive behaviors, organic brain dysfunction, abuse, and violence issues; and incorporates health promotion and wellness issues such as stress management and personal growth for the student. Therapeutic communication techniques, individual and group therapy practices, and community mental health resources are incorporated. Clinical practice takes place in acute care private and state mental health and community-based agencies. FAMILY HEALTH: MATERNAL/NEWBORN This course focuses on family-centered approaches to maternal/newborn care, and incorporates health promotion and wellness issues. The childbearing cycle, including normal experience, high-risk factors, complications, and alterations are studied. Additional women’s health issues are included. Clinical practice takes place in acute care and community-based settings. FAMILY HEALTH: CHILDREN Family-centered care of children is the focus of this course. The course explores issues of normal child care as well as health alterations of children from infancy through adolescence. Students participate as a member of the multidisciplinary health team to provide health promotion, illness prevention, health restoration and maintenance, and rehabilitative care to children and families in acute care and community-based settings. ADULT HEALTH NURSING II This course focuses on complex alterations in life processes, including the effect on the client’s family. The nursing process is used to make clinical decisions and foster health restoration and maintenance. Emphasis on discharge planning is included. Clinical experience occurs in acute care settings. TRANSITIONS IN PROFESSIONAL NURSING This course, designed for the RN student, provides a transition experience into baccalaureate nursing. The philosophy and roles of the baccalaureate nurses are explored in the content of contemporary and future nursing practice. GERONTOLOGY This theoretical course is an exploration of gerontological nusing which provides an opportunity for the student to examine the myths and realities of aging, factors influencing ageism, biological and psychosocial theories of aging, normal aging changes, and the older adult’s adaptation to these changes. The course focuses on strategies to promote an optimal quality of life for older adults. The collaborative role of the nurse, advocacy roles, and the interdisciplinary team approach to meeting client needs are emphasized. RESEARCH IN NURSING The research process and its contributions to professional nursing practice are explored. Published research findings are analyzed in order to enhance the student’s ability to determine potential application to nursing practice. Students present current published research findings by a poster presentation. COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING Theory and concepts of community, community health, and community health nursing are presented. Emphasis is placed on the application of the nursing process, planning, organization, and delivery of services utilizing levels of prevention. Care of populations at risk, political and sociocultural aspects of community, demogaphic and epidemiological methods are included. The concurrent clinical experience assists the student in applying community health principles and implementing concepts of the levels of prevention. The link between health policy and clinical practice is emphasized. The theory component of the course included content on the legislation and/or political process. During this experience, students are introduced to concepts in epidemiology, health assessments of families, and identification of populations at risk. CRITICAL CARE NURSING This course focuses on adult clients with unstable emergent critical illnesses. Students will have the opportunity to integrate nursing, technologic, and scientific knowledge with clinical judgment to potentiate health with a diverse client population. Students will utilize comprehensive assessment techniques, advanced nursing skills, and multiple nursing modalities to maximize optimal health. As a member of the multidisciplinary health team, the professional nursing student role will progress in a variety of critical and emergency care settings. PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN NURSING Professional Issues of Nursing critically analyzes current professional nursing trends and issues, including the socio-economic, political, educational, and other forces affecting the nursing profession. Philosophical, ethical, legal, and moral issues are explored as they impact current and future trends in nursing practice and in the delivery of health care to all persons. MANAGEMENT IN PROFESSIONAL NURSING This course is designed to expand the scope of nursing practice of a senior nursing student with course and clinical activities focusing on the leadership and management aspects of the professional nurse. Clinicals are scheduled with selected nurse preceptors within primary, secondary, and tertiary health care systems, where the student will provide care to a group of clients. The focus is on the consumers’ needs regarding health promotion, illness prevention, health restoration and maintenance, and rehabilitative activities.



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