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Gannon University (Villa Maria School of Nursing)




The Gannon University Villa Maria School of Nursing believes caring nurses make a difference in the lives of patients. Whether you are interested in the technology of an intensive care unit, the overall health of a community, maintaining the health of the elderly, promoting health in children, mothers and babies, or gaining a firm foundation for advanced nursing practice, Gannon’s baccalaureate nursing program can help you achieve your goals. If you want a career that’s intellectually challenging, if you want the opportunity to work with people and technology, if you’re looking for a competitive salary and lots of career options, if you want to make a difference in people’s lives…become a professional nurse.

The employment opportunities for registered nurses (RNs) are excellent, as a continued shortage of RNs is projected through 2020.

The average starting salary for a registered nurse in the United States is between $39,520 and $45,760. Professionals with an advanced degree earn approximately 44 percent more than those with a baccalaureate.



School name:Gannon UniversityVilla Maria School of Nursing
Address:109 University Square
Zip & city:PE 16541-0001 Pennsylvania
Phone:(800) 486-6668
Web:http://www.gannon.edu/PROGRAMS/UNDER/nurse2.asp
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Villa Maria School of Nursing Nursing School Location







Villa Maria School of Nursing Courses


NURSING AS A PROFESSION I
This seminar explores the history of professional nursing and introduces concepts underlying professionalism. The evolution of professional nursing, current educational patterns, nursing roles and practice settings, and nursing as a research-based practice are addressed. Students are introduced to: the key concept of caring as it relates to their professional nursing role; the necessity of ongoing reflection and self evaluation; service learning and its role in personal and professional development. Open to all University students.

NURSING AS A PROFESSION II
This seminar is the second in a series of two professional nursing seminars. This seminar underscores nursing's role within the health care environment, and emphasizes nursing's expertise in health promotion and risk reduction across the lifespan. The concept of the health-illness continuum is discussed as is the impact of culture, ethnicity, and personal values on health behaviors. Students are introduced to: legal and ethical principles that guide nursing practice; the impact of personal and professional values on decision making and professional behavior; basic models for delivery of nursing care; and human services agencies. Open to all University students.

PHARMACOLOGY AND NURSING IMPLICATIONS OF MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION
This course is designed to focus on nursing pharmacology by presenting a firm theoretical foundation and a practical approach to drug therapy applicable in community-based settings. The course presents general principles, theories, and facts about drugs. General characteristics of major classifications of medications are discussed. Specific information regarding action, dosage, side effects, adverse reactions, and contraindications of selected medications within each classification is addressed. Practical information is presented on how the nursing process is integrated with pharmacology. Specific drug information is discussed in relation to assessment, nursing diagnoses, client monitoring, interventions, client education, and evaluation of safe and effective drug therapy.

NURSING PRACTICE COMPETENCIES
This course focuses on the acquisition and use of nursing practice competencies required for the delivery of nursing care. Emphasis is placed on mastery of core scientific principles that underlie all competencies. It is not within the scope of this course to cover every skill encountered by the professional nurse. Strategies are employed which help the student identify those competencies essential for baccalaureate nursing practice and understand the scientific principles that underpin the application of those competencies. Students are expected to apply concepts and assessment techniques learned during previous courses. Supervised on-campus and off-campus labs are scheduled for student learning.

HEALTH ASSESSMENT I
This is the first course in a two-course sequence in health assessment for the professional nursing student. Successful completion of this course will provide the student a nursing approach for conducting and documenting a comprehensive health assessment. The student will learn to consider normal variations specific to gender, age, developmental level, and culture. A major expectation is that the student applies appropriate health promotion strategies to members of the peer group and to identified populations within the community.
Health Assessment I focuses on concepts specific to the nursing process, the environment, and safety, as well as physical assessment techniques, interviewing and communication skills, the taking of health histories, vital signs and physical measurements, including height, weight, and body mass index.
In addition, specific health assessment data collection strategies are stressed, including general health, nutritional, mental status, pain, spiritual, and sexual. Expected findings across the lifespan are identified. The student learns documentation requirements, medical terminology and abbreviations, and begins the application of the principles of teaching and learning.
Students are expected to identify appropriate health assessment data collection strategies and to apply appropriate health promotion strategies as outlined by course faculty. Supervised on-campus and off-campus clinical laboratory sessions are scheduled to enhance student learning.

HEALTH ASSESSMENT II
This is the second course in a two-course sequence in health assessment for the professional nursing student. Successful completion of this course will enhance the nursing approach for conducting and documenting a comprehensive health assessment. The student will add to the knowledge gained in the first course in this series. A major expectation is that the student applies appropriate health promotion strategies to identified populations within the community.
Health Assessment II builds on all concepts learned in Health Assessment I, concepts specific to the nursing process, the environment, and safety, as well as physical assessment techniques, interviewing and communication skills, the taking of health histories, vital signs and physical measurements, including height, weight, and body mass index. The student is expected to incorporate specific health assessment data collection strategies, including general health, nutritional, mental status, pain, spiritual, and sexual, as well as expected findings across the lifespan into nursing care strategies. In addition, the student is expected to document appropriately, use medical terminology and abbreviations correctly, and apply the principles of teaching and learning effectively.
Systems are introduced to increase physical assessment capabilities. Systems presented during this semester include: integumentary; head, eye, ear, nose, and throat [HEENT]; cardiovascular; respiratory; gastrointestinal [GI]; genitourinary [GU]; musculoskeletal; reproductive; neurological; peripheral vascular; lymphatic; and endocrine.
Students are expected to use concepts learned in Health Assessment I and add knowledge gained in Health Assessment II to increase competency in health assessment. Students are required to conduct a comprehensive health assessment and to apply appropriate health promotion strategies as outlined by course faculty. Supervised on-campus and off-campus clinical laboratory sessions are scheduled to enhance student learning.

THE RESEARCH PROCESS IN NURSING
Using a comprehensive approach, this course is designed to stimulate student interest in the research process, theory development, and translation of findings to nursing practice. Students learn the components, principles, and methods of scientific research to become discerning consumers of research.

INFLUENCES ON HEALTH AND DISEASE
This course enables the student to explore values that underlie health seeking behaviors and the provision of care. Students explore various behaviors that influence health, wellness, and motivation to seek health care. The influences of family, culture, lifestyle choices, and at-risk behaviors are considered. The course enables the student to understand the basic concepts of biological, psychological, and spiritual processes and how these affect the health of an individual across the life span. The concepts of homeostasis, mechanisms of disease, and crisis and stress related to acute or chronic illness are explored specific to how these concepts affect the patient and the patient’s family. An overview of shock, inflammation, infection, altered immune response, oncology, and fluid and electrolyte balance is presented. In addition, the student will learn the nursing responsibilities associated with care of the patient during the perioperative period. This course must be taken in the fall semester, at the beginning of the Junior level of nursing courses.

PROMOTING HEALTHY CHILDBEARING
In this course students will have the opportunity to participate in the excitement, wonder, and mystery of birth - a learning experience that will forever influence the way they see the self, the world, and the future. They also have the opportunity to examine theoretical and clinical experiences from a personal perspective and to explore their beliefs and values about childbirth and parenting.
Maternal-newborn nursing focuses on the health needs and responses of women, their partners and their families. The practice of maternal-newborn nursing is directed toward improving the quality of life for infants and the adults who assume primary responsibility for the infants well being. Nursing not only involves direct care to the childbearing family, but also includes health teaching and counseling.

PROMOTING HEALTH AND HEALTH RESTORATION OF OLDER ADULTS
This course is designed to assist the student to adopt the behaviors inherent in the role of the professional nurse. Through lectures and planned clinical experiences, the student applies concepts of health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention and health restoration for older adults. The student will work with older adults in a variety of community-based settings as they assess and manage physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs of older adults.

PROMOTING HEALTH IN CHILDREARING FAMILIES
This course provides students with the opportunity to apply the nursing process in promoting the health of pediatric populations. Three levels of prevention are addressed with students providing anticipatory guidance, wellness care, age appropriate screenings and illness care. Health promotion strategies are applied in such a manner as to recognize the family as the primary caregiver. Clinical experiences are community-based and include ambulatory clinics, educational and in-patient sites.

PROMOTING HEALTH AND HEALTH RESTORATION IN ADULTS I
This course is designed to assist the student to gain an understanding of the health care needs of the acute or chronically ill adult. The course incorporates principles of developmental needs of adults, who have socially and culturally diverse backgrounds, in a variety of settings. Collaboration of the client and health care team in promoting and maintaining an optimal level of functioning are addressed. Illness care in the adult client is emphasized.

NURSE POWER POLITICS (CAPSTONE)
This capstone Liberal Studies course is a seminar experience designed to provide the student with an opportunity to explore contemporary health care issues, to analyze these issues within the historical, professional context as well as the context of his or her value system, and to adopt a position regarding such issues. The student is engaged in an active exploration of his/her own philosophy of nursing. Students are guided through this analysis by faculty who facilitate open discussions and exchange of ideas. Students develop skill in formulation of a position, consideration of others’ viewpoints and defense of such a position, as well as to realize the potential impact and power of political activity. Students also realize the importance of individual action and commitment. Service learning is a required component of the course.

PROMOTING HEALTH AND HEALTH RESTORATION IN ADULTS II
This course provides the student with knowledge and nursing strategies that can be applied to clients with complex health concerns including chronic, multisystem, life threatening, and end of life care. The focus is on strategies that recognize the quality of life and maintain optimal level of functioning. Students build upon concepts learned in previous courses and apply concepts from concurrent courses. Adult critical care nursing is emphasized.

PROMOTING AND RESTORING MENTAL HEALTH
This course incorporates nursing care of persons who are mentally healthy as well as those with known psychiatric disorders. The course provides students with an opportunity to explore a broad range of nursing interventions to promote optimal mental health. The emphasis is placed on the use of advanced therapeutic communication techniques.

MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP IN NURSING
This course focuses on the knowledge and skills related to the delivery of health care services within a nursing management context. Theories, concepts and models are presented which give the student an understanding of the knowledge base required for effective management and assuming a leadership role in professional nursing practice. The course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to apply principles in planning and delegating nursing care and discusses developing creative roles for managing and leading in nursing.

PROMOTING HEALTHY COMMUNITIES
This course provides students a perspective of professional nursing at the community level of practice. Course content will provide an overview of specific issues and societal concerns that affect community health nursing practice; epidemiological applications in community health nursing; educational theories, models, and principles applied in community health nursing; risk factors and health problems for defined populations across the lifespan; issues and approaches in providing for the health care of defined populations in the community; specific health care needs and issues for populations at risk; communicable disease risk and prevention; and the diversity in the role of the community health nurse. Students apply previous knowledge and the nursing process in maximizing the health status of individuals, families, and defined populations within the community.

COMPREHENSIVE NURSING PRACTICUM
This senior nursing practicum facilitates the students’ ability to synthesize knowledge, skills, and experiences in selected health care settings. This experience enables the student to develop independence in professional practice. Individual goals and objectives are mutually determined by faculty and student to evaluate success in the practicum. Students are paired with an agency preceptor to attain individualized course objectives. A faculty-facilitated seminar is conducted weekly. Last semester of the Senior year.

NATIVE AMERICAN PEOPLES: STATE OF THE NATION'S HEALTH
This course provides learners with an opportunity to explore the state of Native American health. Students explore the historical, legal, socioeconomic and cultural factors which impact the current health status of Native Americans. Students also explore their own attitudes and beliefs regarding the Native American culture. Students are guided to an understanding of these concepts through exposure to art, music and literature as well as contact with Native American persons. Themes of sovereignty and native healing practices are central to the course. Open to all majors.

SPECIAL TOPICS IN NURSING
Special topic courses are developed by faculty around a specific area of interest. Objectives may be defined by faculty or mutually identified by students and faculty.

ELECTIVE CLINICAL PRACTICUM
The Elective Clinical Practicum provides senior professional nursing majors with learning experiences to expand the student’s understanding of the professional nurse role in a chosen clinical area. The course is limited to seniors who have a demonstrated ability to work independently. The student must follow the School of Nursing guidelines for practicum courses.
1-3 clinical laboratory credits, Fall or Spring

BASIC DYSRHYTHMIA INTERPRETATION
This course is designed for professional nursing majors who desire to develop skills in dysrhythmia interpretation. Identification of EKG features, predisposing conditions and treatments; role of the nurse in client care; and current ACLS interventions are emphasized.

WOMEN'S HEALTH ISSUES
This course will provide the student an understanding of health issues affecting women. Major health promotion strategies and their theoretical models will be presented. Analysis of case studies will enhance student understanding of effective methods of promoting positive health-seeking behaviors among women of all ages across cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds. The influence of social, economic and political issues on women's health will be stressed. Open to all university students. The course is cross-listed for undergraduate and graduate nursing curricula.

SCHOOL NURSING
This course is designed to focus on the professional nurse's role in school health. Emphasis is placed on the dimensions of school nursing. Clinical facilities for this course include the Erie City School District and other school systems within the County. Required for School Nurse Certification. 100 hours supervised clinical in school nursing. Not open to juniors. Senior year

FUNDAMENTALS OF FORENSIC NURSING
This introductory course provides the student with knowledge and nursing strategy to better meet the needs of those affected by forensic related health care situations and ultimately improve patient outcomes. The course explores the history and development of forensic nursing as a scientific subspecialty of nursing; the forensic nursing process; application of the forensic nursing role (i.e. sexual assault management, death investigation, child death review, abuse/neglect, emergency department, etc.), violence and victimology; injury identification and interpretation; evidence recognition, collection, preservation, and documentation; and finally, forensic nursing and the law/legal interface.

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