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Minnesota State University - Mankato (School of Nursing)




Since 1953, Minnesota State University, Mankato School of Nursing has offered a program leading to a bachelor of science degree with a major in nursing. Three programs exist: Basic Nursing Program, BS Completion Program, and Accelerated Nursing Program. The LPN Option is currently on hold. The program is approved by the Minnesota Board of Nursing, which authorizes graduates to take the NCLEX-RN. Graduates are qualified for Public Health Nurse certification and also meet the requirements for school nurse licensure.The School of Nursing also offers three graduate programs designed to prepare advanced practice nurses. A Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree can be earned through either the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) program or the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) program. A Master of Science with a major in nursing can be earned through the Nurse Educator program. Post Master's certificates are also available through each graduate program. Both the undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

The School of Nursing is committed to excellence and has received top national honors for an exceptional and innovative curriculum in Gerontologic Nursing by the Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing in collaboration with the AACN. Classrooms, laboratories and offices for the School of Nursing are located in the Leichsenring Nursing Center, third floor of Wissink Building in the center of the campus. The latest in educational technology is available. A few courses or segments of courses are either on-line over the Internet for students in the BS Completion Program and the Graduate Program. The School of Nursing is actively involved in several grant funded collaborative initiatives in Minnesota which provide opportunities for interdisciplinary work within rural and underserved areas. Nursing faculty are committed to excellence in learning within an environment of caring. Faculty are actively involved in a variety of research projects and community endeavors. Recent faculty honors include the prestigious MN Association of Colleges of Nursing (MACN) Nurse Educator of the Year Award for 1998 and the prestigious MN Nurses Association (MNA) Nurse Researcher of the Year award for 1998.

Students have a variety of clinical experiences in rural and metro/urban settings. The clinical resources include hospitals in Mankato and the Twin Cities area, long-term care facilities, a regional mental health center, and various public health and home care agencies.

VISION

The School of Nursing will be recognized for innovation and excellence in nursing education, scholarship and practice.

MISSION

The School of Nursing is a learning community dedicated to educating entry-level and advanced practice nurses, developing nursing knowledge and serving diverse communities.

These vision and mission statements support and inform both undergraduate curriculum revision and graduate program expansion, including a new consortium Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program with Winona State, Metropolitan State and Minnesota State University, Moorhead. Seven students have been admitted to each university in the first cohort of the DNP program.

PHILOSOPHY

Nursing is a discipline, a profession, and a service. The discipline of nursing is a body of knowledge, formalized in philosophical and scientific theory/theoretical statements and developed through a variety of methods of scholarly inquiry. The nurse integrates scientific and philosophic knowledge with aesthetic and personal knowing to form the basis of practice. As a profession, nursing is a self-regulating organization of persons with unique knowledge obtained through specific educational programs. Members of the profession provide a unique service in accordance with a code of ethics. The knowledge on which the service is based includes nursing knowledge and knowledge from the natural and social sciences, and from the arts and humanities. The essence of the service is an interpersonal process aimed at facilitating the health of persons, families and groups. Because nursing service is mandated by society, provision of the service fulfills a contract between society and the profession.

While health has multiple conceptualizations, it is viewed as essentially either a dynamic state or a process. As a state, health is considered to be a condition of dynamic equilibrium, that is perceived by the person as well-being and manifested as balance among life processes. Health is also viewed as a developmental process of defining and creating well-being throughout the life span. Because persons may hold conflicting views of health, the focus of nursing service is the health experience as defined by the client.

In order to facilitate health, nurses must understand the nature of persons, families and groups and their relationships with their environments. A person is a unique whole whose characteristics are different from and more than the sum of the characteristics of her/his parts. The same is true of families, groups, and communities. These human entities have intrinsic value and are worthy of respect. Consequently, the values and beliefs of persons, families, and groups must be understood and honored, regardless of the nurse's own values and beliefs if the goal of facilitating health is to be achieved. Environment is a relative term, referring to all realms of human experience that are not a manifestation of the person, family or group. Thus, nurses must understand the nature of various environments. These environments include physiological, geophysical, emotional, interpersonal, social, economic, political, cultural, spiritual relationships in which the person, family, group or community is situated.

The nursing student is an intelligent, articulate, autonomous, ethical person. He or she is able to assess situations, make decisions, develop strategies, and implement change. The student advocates for self and others and is a proponent of social justice. The student is also able to propose learning goals and to evaluate and modify behavior.

In order to educate students to practice professional nursing at the entry and the advanced levels, learning situations must be structured to promote the development of empirical, philosophical, aesthetic, and personal ways of knowing. Specifically, critical thinking skills, communications skills, reflective skills and psychomotor skills must be taught and integrated.

The faculty recognizes that students differ in abilities, learning styles, educational and cultural backgrounds, and goals. Therefore, a variety of learning modalities to facilitate the educational needs of students should be provided. The faculty's responsibility is to challenge and support students by structuring learning activities/situations that require inquiry, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Learning is optimal when faculty and students develop a dynamic professional relationship fostered by mutual respect and when they engage in critical reflection. As a result of this learner-focused approach to education, the student develops cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills that can be used in diverse life situations.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE WITH A MAJOR IN NURSING

A total of 128 semester credits are necessary for the baccalaureate degree in nursing. The nursing major consists of 63 credits. The remaining courses consist of both general education and elective courses. Four years of full-time study are needed to complete the requirements for graduation. Many students develop schedules that allow them to work part time and spread course requirements over five or more years. Transfer students may need only two and one-half years to complete the courses. The SON Prenursing Advisor assists each student in planning a program to meet his/her needs. Students are strongly encouraged to communicate with the Prenursing Advisor prior to registering.

The School of Nursing is located in the Leichsenring Nursing Center, third floor of Wissink Hall in the center of the campus. Students will have a variety of clinical experiences in rural and metro/urban settings such as hospitals, nursing homes and community agencies.

The nursing curriculum is designed to provide opportunities for the student to develop a sound theoretical and clinical foundation for the practice of professional nursing. The graduate is prepared for a variety of roles in the community, including the responsibility for health promotion; prevention of disease; and caring for the sick in the community, the hospital and the home. An understanding of people and how they adapt to the environment is essential to the provision of these health-care services.

The program is approved by the Minnesota Board of Nursing and accredited by the National League for Nursing. Graduates of the program are eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse. Successfully passing this exam permits the graduate to practice as a registered nurse (R.N.). Graduates will have met the requirements for certification as public health nurses in Minnesota.



School name:Minnesota State University - MankatoSchool of Nursing
Address:360 Wissink Hall
Zip & city:MN 56001 Minnesota
Phone:507-389-6828
Web:http://ahn.mnsu.edu/programs/sn/index.html
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School of Nursing Courses


COURAGE, CARING, AND TEAM BUILDING
This experiential course will prepare students for effective participation in a variety of groups. Students can expect to experience various group member roles through structured activities within the Minnesota State Mankato culture and with diverse cultures. Students will learn about risk taking, trust building, cooperation/collaboration in groups and caring for self and others in the larger community.

NURSING PERSPECTIVES
Introduction to nursing as a profession and career, exploration of nursing practice concepts and overview of the nursing curriculum and conceptual framework.

FOUNDATIONS IN NURSING SCIENCE
Introduction to the Roy Adaptation Model as a framework for critical thinking, nursing process and practice. Development of effective individual and group communication skills; application of communication theory in small groups. Use of the interview process to collect data from individuals and families. Beginning socialization to nursing as a profession.

ALTERED HUMAN FUNCTIONING
A holistic perspective of the pathophysiologic functioning of the human adaptive system. Includes alterations in oxygenation, nutrition, elimination, activity and rest, and protection. Also includes alterations in processes related to the senses, fl uid and electrolytes and neurological and endocrine functions.

PSYCHOMOTOR STRATEGIES IN NURSING I
The first of two psychomotor skills courses in which the Nursing Learning Resource Center is utilized for self-directed learning activities and evaluation of performance with clinical application experience. The psychomotor skills are beginning to intermediate concepts, principles and techniques utilized with patients in a variety of clinical settings.

PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING PRACTICE
Introduction to pharmacologic concepts with emphasis on nursing responsibilities in drug therapy.

PROFESSIONAL NURSING FOR RN STUDENTS
Introduction to professional nursing with emphasis on: adaptation and the nursing process; socialization to the profession; self-awareness; and interactive skills for nursing practice.

NURSING DOMAINS-RN’S
Concepts related to the practice of professional nursing in the four domains comprising the health system: trauma/acute illness; chronic disease management; health promotion/maintenance/education; and supportive care management.

NURSING DOMAINS CLINICAL-RN’S
Clinical application of nursing care for individual and family clients in the domains of health promotion/maintenance/ education, trauma/acute illness, and chronic disease management with emphasis on the physiologic mode.

NURSING THEORY AND RESEARCH
Introduction to being a member of a profession with emphasis on understanding the relationship between nursing theory and practice, the research process and ethical decision making in nursing practice.

GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING
Theory course on the promotion of physiological and psychosocial adaptation of the older adult client.

GERONTOLOGICAL CLINICAL
Gerontological clinical nursing practice in various health care settings.

GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING FOR RN'S
Examines the nurse's role in the promotion of physiological and psychosocial adaptation of the older adult client.

ALTERED PHYSIOLOGIC MODE NURSING I
The first of two theory courses. Emphasizes the promotion of adaptation in individuals experiencing alterations in activity and rest patterns, ingestion, digestion, absorption and elimination, protection, endocrine function, inflammatory- immune-infectious response, and neoplastic responses. Concepts of stress and coping, powerlessness, sick role and long term illness are introduced.

ALTERED PHYSIOLOGIC MODE CLINICAL I
The first of two clinical courses emphasizing the nursing care of adult clients experiencing physiologic and psychosocial alterations. The Roy Adaptation Model will be utilized to provide nursing care for clients requiring supportive, acute and chronic care in simple to intermediate situations.

ALTERED HUMAN FUNCTIONING FOR RN'S
Explores pathophysiology concepts to enhance the RN student's understanding of illness and health. Identifi es rational for clinical judgment and therapeutic intervention in disease conditions. Analyzes psychosocial and family concepts that emerge with pathophysiologic alterations.

PSYCHOMOTOR STRATEGIES IN NURSING II
The second of two psychomotor skills courses in which the Nursing Learning Resource Center is utilized for selfdirected learning activities and evaluation of performance. The psychomotor skills included in this course relate to the more advanced concepts, principles and techniques utilized with patients in a variety of clinical settings.

CHILDBEARING FAMILY NURSING
A course designed to describe the physiological and psychosocial changes that occur in families during the childbearing period. Key concepts include personal and family adaptation and health promotion.

CHILDBEARING FAMILY CLINICAL
This clinical course focuses on the care of the childbearing family. The nursing process is utilized to plan and implement care of normal and high risk perinatal clients in the hospital and community based settings.

CHILD HEALTH NURSING
Concepts related to adaptation, growth and development, and specific physiologic and psychosocial alterations of the child from infancy through adolescence.

CHILD HEALTH CLINICAL
A clinical course utilizing the nursing process to plan and implement nursing care for children from infancy through adolescence with a variety of specifi c physiologic and psychosocial responses. Clinical experiences with children and their families occur in acute care and community based settings.

PROVIDER OF CARE I
Explores the nurse's role in interacting with and providing care to families of diverse religious, ethnic and cultural backgrounds across the lifespan. Examines spirituality and the integration of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional practices to provide holistic care.

PSYCHOSOCIAL NURSING
Utilizing the nursing process framework the course emphasizes psychoanalytic theories, assessment and therapeutic communication. Historical landmarks in the care of the mentally ill are addressed, as is the importance of the client's culture. Nursing interventions for specific disorders are discussed.

NURSING PERSPECTIVES OF LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT
Current theories derived from research in organizational psychology, business, and educational leadership are explored as they apply to the role of nurse leader and/or manager of nursing personnel giving direct care. Patient care, human resource and operational management skills in interaction with a changing health care environment are emphasized.

MANAGEMENT AND PRINCIPLES OF CARE
Current theories derived from organizational psychology, business, and educational leadership are explored and applied to the role of nurse manager within the complex changing health-care system. Management of human resources, patient care, and operational skills in interaction is emphasized.

NURSING ELECTIVE
Several sections on various topics not included in the curriculum. Each section is a different course and expands on the nursing major courses. Examples of topics are ethical dimensions, laughter and wellness in nursing practice, dementia, rural nursing, cancer care, etc.

NURSING RESEARCH
Introduces the components of the research process. The student is prepared to develop an evidence-based nursing practice and to participate in the research process.

MENTAL HEALTH NURSING
Issues of self-esteem, dependency, abuse, and violence are addressed related to inpatient and community based nursing care of individuals, groups, families, and organizational systems.

MENTAL HEALTH CLINICAL
The focus of this clinical course is on patterns of ineffective behavioral responses related to conditions of mental illness. Mental health concepts and process skills are applied to working with individuals, groups, families, and members of the health team.

ALTERED PHYSIOLOGIC MODE NURSING II
The second of two theory courses. Emphasizes the promotion of adaptation in individuals experiencing alterations in fl uid and electrolytes/burns, oxygenation, renal elimination, perception, and multiple trauma. Concepts of crisis theory are introduced. Psychosocial needs of both clients and families are integrated throughout the course.

ALTERED PHYSIOLOGIC MODE CLINICAL II
The second of two clinical courses emphasizing the nursing care of adult clients experiencing physiologic and psychosocial alterations. The Roy Adaptation Model will be utilized to provide and coordinate nursing care of clients requiring acute and chronic care in complex situations.

ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT
This course offers theoretical and simulated clinical practice to develop advanced skills in health and physical assessment throughout the life span. Students complete a client data base and identify nursing problems necessary in making clinical judgments and planning and caring for the health care needs of individual clients.

COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING
This course focuses on the community and integrates the principles of nursing and public health. Nursing care of individuals, families and groups is addressed within the context of promoting, maintaining, and restoring health.

COMMUNITY HEALTH CLINICAL
The focus of this clinical course is on community based nursing and home health care. Public health concepts are applied to promote adaptation in individuals, families, and populations.

NURSING SYNTHESIS SEMINAR
This course focuses on the transition of the student into the role of the professional nurse. Licensure and implications for accountability will be addressed.

NURSING SYNTHESIS CLINICAL
The purpose of this capstone clinical course is to expand the student’s knowledge and skill in caring for individuals, families and/or communities and to gain reality-based insights into the role of the professional nurse.

PROVIDER OF CARE II
This capstone course focuses on the community as the client and integrates previously learned theory and principles of nursing.

PROVIDER OF CARE II CLINICAL
Health promotion, disease prevention, and health education are operationalized as principal interventions within the context of community health.

WORKSHOP
Workshop(s) with various topics and titles.

IN-SERVICE
Workshop(s) with various topics and titles.

SUMMER INTERNSHIP
This course provides clinical based learning opportunities to encourage application of theory and research bases knowledge in clinical practice. Students will engage in experiences to enhance the development of their professional nursing role.

INDIVIDUAL STUDY
Individual study according to outcomes developed by faculty and student(s).

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