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Niagara University (Nursing Program)




Niagara University’s Bachelor of Science (BS) in Nursing is a completion program for registered nurses prepared in an accredited Associate Degree Program or Hospital School of Nursing.

Our goal is to educate a nurse who, upon completion of the program, has been prepared to lead, manage and deliver outstanding professional comprehensive nursing care in any health care setting. The educational objectives of the BS degree are built upon the strong clinical nursing skills acquired in the associate degree program.

The BS program focuses on preparing a nurse who internalizes and integrates the professional nursing paradigm of critical analysis and problem solving, health care leadership and management, communication and research utilization, community based care and the values of respect for human dignity and ethical decision making related to the scope of professional nursing practice. The program will use active learning strategies and be flexible and accessible for the adult learners.

MISSION

To provide collegiate education, flexible in format and excellent in content and standards for the student, integrating professional, liberal arts, sciences and religious/ethics studies with community service and clinical experiences;

To produce a baccalaureate prepared nurse who integrates critical thinking, leadership in health care, expertise in nursing practice and social responsibility in the community and society at large.

HISTORY

The impetus for striving to become a Sigma Theta Tau Chapter came from Sr. Bernadette Armiger, D.C., Ph.D., who was Dean of the College of Nursing from 1968-1974. She and two faculty moderators, Mary Kornguth, MS, and Frances Wollner, MSN, established the Nursing Honor Society at Niagara University in 1975. One of the organization’s main goals was to become a chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society Of Nursing.

To be eligible for membership in Sigma Theta Tau, Niagara’s College of Nursing was required to develop and maintain, over a two-year period, an honor society, which would reflect the traits and the character of the national organization.

At the Sigma Theta Tau International Convention in October 1977, the House of Delegates voted to approve Niagara University College of Nursing’s request for membership.

Sigma Theta Tau International granted a charter to the nursing honor society at Niagara University on March 4, 1978. The installing officer was Rebecca Markel, MS, Second Vice President, Sigma Theta Tau International.

Gamma Theta Chapter is number 078. Today, there are 424 chapters located in various college and university campuses in the United States, Canada, China, Pakistan, South Korea, Australia, Taiwan, Brazil, and the Netherlands.

Six nursing students who had a vision for nursing, and recognized the need to promote nursing scholarship founded Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society at Indiana University in 1922. Today, there are more than 120,000 active members of Sigma Theta Tau International throughout the world!

Sr. Aloise Anne Zasowska, C.S.S.F., Ed.D. , became Dean of the College of Nursing in 1975. She supported the members of the Nursing Honor Society in their efforts to become a chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International.

On March 4, 1978, Sr. Aloise Anne Zasowska and 12 faculty members of the College of Nursing were among the 75 Charter Members inducted. These faculty members included: Sr. Mary Balthasar, Jean Borgatti, Patricia Burns, Margaret Corcoran, Mary Ruth Finn, Pearl Gessner, Margaret Harrup, Mary Kornguth, Mary Lorich, Adele Pillitteri, Flora Taylor and Frances Wollner. Sr. Bernadette Armiger was already a member of another chapter. She was living out of town and was unable to attend the chartering ceremony.



School name:Niagara UniversityNursing Program
Address:Timon Hall Room 105 B
Zip & city:NY 14109 New York
Phone:(716) 286-7358
Web:http://www.niagara.edu/nursing/
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Nursing Program Courses


NUTRITION FOR LIVING
This course is a beginning study of the physiological functions of nutrients in cellular metabolism including their role in health maintenance and in disease prevention. Nutritional requirements are discussed in relation to physiological need and provide the foundation of the balanced diet. Consideration is given to the cultural, psychosocial, developmental and environmental influences which affect dietary intake of individuals. A balanced diet is discussed as a dynamic rather than a static entity. Nutritional labeling, food safety and alternative nutrition (herbs, phytochemicals etc.) are examined. This scientific approach to the study of nutrition should enable students to make sound nutritional decisions in today’s world.

NURSING CONCEPTS I: THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS
This first-level course introduces the basic concept for beginning nursing practice in the role of the nurse as caregiver. The concepts of health and nursing process are presented using Imogene King’s theory of goal attainment. In addition, the student will relate concepts of culture, communication, teaching-learning, and leadership to care of the individual. The nursing process will be used to promote health and to restore health of the individual with selected imbalances in health.

NURSING PRACTICUM I
This first-level clinical course is designed to combine theoretical knowledge gained in Nursing Concepts I: Theoretical Foundations with clinical practice. Skills basic to beginning nursing practice will be taught and an emphasis will be placed on communication between student and client. The student will have opportunities to apply the nursing process in a clinical setting with the adult who is experiencing an imbalance in health.

NURSING CONCEPTS II: DEVELOPING FAMILY
This second-level course focuses on knowledge and concepts necessary to the nursing process with the individual as a member of the developing family. These concepts are related to the family within a variety of cultures. The family will be viewed as an interpersonal system in which health is promoted and restored. The nursing role behaviors of teaching-learning, communication, and advocacy are emphasized. Ethical and legal issues relevant to the developing family will be introduced.

NURSING PRACTICUM II
This second-level clinical course combines theoretical knowledge gained in Nursing Concepts II: Developing Family with clinical practice. The student will apply the nursing process to the care of the developing family to promote and restore health. Leadership incorporating the role of advocate will be introduced in clinical settings. Selected nursing research findings will be utilized to enhance the quality of nursing practice.

HEALTH ASSESSMENT
This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skill necessary to perform a health assessment for an adult. Knowledge from this assessment is utilized as a data base for planning nursing care. The student must project a teaching plan for the purpose of health promotion. Emphasis is placed on documentation of findings. The student is expected to apply the knowledge and skill gained in this course in all clinical courses.

NURSING IMPLICATIONS IN DRUG THERAPY
Content of this course includes an overall view of drugs used for treatment of clinical disorders of clients at all levels of the age continuum. Pertinent information about specific drug classifications, dosage, interactions and nursing implications will be discussed. Nursing responsibilities in the application of drug therapy to the individual will be emphasized by utilization of a case-study approach in class discussions.

PROFESSIONAL ISSUES AND THEORY
This course enables the registered nurse to internalize the socialization process of professional nursing addressing professional issues that impacts practice. The concepts of health and nursing processes are presented using Imogene King’s theory of goal attainment. Concepts of culture, communication, teaching-learning, and leadership are discussed as they relate to the promotion and restoration of health. The course also allows the student to demonstrate the internalization of norms, values, knowledge and behaviors of the professional nurse.

HONORS THESIS I AND II
Individual research of a substantive nature pursued in the student’s major field of study. The research will conclude in a written thesis or an original project, and an oral defense.

NUTRITION AND HEALTH
This course introduces the student to nutrition and its role in health. Nutrients are discussed in relation to culture, development, and biological, psychosocial, and environmental influences on food intake. Nutritional assessment is the basis for implementing nutritional care in diet modification and education. Emphasis will be placed on biochemical and physiological changes in health and dietary modification.

RESEARCH PROCESS IN NURSING
This course focuses on developing an awareness of the role of the nurse in participating in systematic research activities specific to the practice environment. The identification of research problems related to the individual, family, group, and community from various cultures are identified. Discussion will focus on implications of scientific inquiry that enhance the ability to recognize, communicate and use knowledge in the provision of care that is unique to nursing.

NURSING PROCESS AND THE AGED CLIENT
This course utilizes a multidisciplinary approach to the understanding of the aging process with focus on the role of the nurse and the aged client. Theory and field experience in health care management in a variety of settings in the community are explored.

NURSING CONCEPTS III: MATURING FAMILY
This second-level course focuses on knowledge and concepts necessary to apply the nursing process to the care of the maturing family within a variety of cultures. The maturing family will be viewed as an interpersonal system in which health is promoted, restored, and maintained. The nursing role behaviors of psychotherapeutic communicator, change agent, and coordinator are presented. Issues relevant to physical and mental health imbalances and maturing family relationships are discussed.

NURSING PRACTICUM III
This second-level clinical course combines theoretical knowledge gained in Nursing Concepts III: Maturing Family with clinical practice in the care of the maturing family. The student utilizes contemporary nursing practice in care of the maturing family with selected health imbalances. Professional collaboration with other health care providers will be utilized in the delivery of nursing care. Selected nursing research findings will be applied to enhance the quality of nursing practice.

NURSING CONCEPTS IV: COMMUNITY
This third-level course focuses on the community as a social system. Knowledge and concepts essential for the collaborative role of the nurse will include teaching-learning, research, culture, and communication in a community context. Emphasis will be placed on community health and rehabilitation concepts for the purposes of promoting, restoring, and maintaining health. Current issues and trends relevant to community health will be discussed.

NURSING PRACTICUM IV: COMMUNITY
This third-level clinical course combines theoretical knowledge gained in Nursing Concepts IV: Community with clinical practice in the care of the community. The student utilizes the nursing process, research findings, and multi-disciplinary collaboration for health promotion, restoration, and maintenance in the community. This course emphasizes levels of prevention for acute and chronic health imbalances.

PROFESSIONAL SOCIALIZATION
The focus of this capstone course is application of goal attainment theory to the development of professional socialization. The student will address professional issues of a contemporary and future nature. The course allows the student to demonstrate the internalization of norms, values, knowledge and behaviors in development of identity as a professional nurse.

NURSING CARE OF FAMILIES THROUGHOUT THE LIFE SPAN
This course focuses on knowledge, concepts and skills necessary to apply the nursing process to the family throughout the life span. Emphasis will be placed on the role of the nurse in promotion, restoration and maintenance of health of families within the community, while the nurse acts as collaborator, advocate and change partner. Ethical and legal issues, communication and teaching-learning, research and cultural influences will be discussed. A clinical practicum will permit students to integrate and apply concepts relative to families within the community.

LEADERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL NURSING
This course focuses on the knowledge, concepts and processes essential for professional practice as a leader in the health care community. The role of the professional nurse will be explored in relation to: group organization, processes and dynamics, and leadership theories and styles. The health care community will be analyzed as a social system. Emphasis will be placed on the roles of the nurse-leader in the organization, teaching-learning, decision-making, management, and change processes. Current issues and trends relevant to the nursing profession and health care community will be discussed. Interaction with professional nurses during field placement in the community will provide students with the opportunity to integrate and analyze concepts relative to leadership roles.

INTERNSHIP
This clinical course provides the student with the opportunity to apply learned knowledge and skills, and gain competence and confidence in the practice of professional nursing care. Faculty mentors coordinate concentrated clinical practice under preceptor ship in selected areas of nursing. Focus is given to selected activities related to the process of transition from student to professional nurse.

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CLINICAL NURSING
Approval for independent study must be granted by the chairperson of the department and the dean. Open to nursing students of junior and senior status. An opportunity is given to fulfill the objectives of a required elective through independent study in clinical nursing under the guidance of a faculty mentor. The student must submit a proposal outlining the objectives, methodology and learning experiences of the study and meet all the evaluative criteria established with the faculty mentor.

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