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Seattle University (College of Nursing)




HISTORY

The history of Seattle University College of Nursing is linked to the early history of Providence Hospital in Seattle. In 1877, the Sisters of Providence responded to a request to care for those in the Seattle area who were sick and poor. The "Poor House" at 5th and Spring streets was eventually moved to 17th and Jefferson and became Providence Hospital. By 1907, seventeen Sisters of Charity of Providence were registered as nurses in the state of Washington. Needs for nursing care increased, and the Providence Hospital School of Nursing was opened July 16, 1907, with four lay students enrolled. The first class of the Providence Hospital School of Nursing graduated in 1910.

Today the College of Nursing resides in the completely renovated historic Garrand Building at the center of campus. This building, the oldest on campus, was the original site of Seattle College. It is located between the Administration and Casey buildings with entrances on the south and east sides. The building houses the Dean's office, faculty offices, and several conference rooms. A rededication of the building was held on December 8, 1994, with Archbishop Thomas Murphy officiating at a morning mass. In Fall 2003, the School of Nursing officially changed it's name to the College of Nursing reflecting the growth and complexity of its programs of study. Through the years, students and faculty have been important contributing members of this community.

On July 16, 2005 the community got its first look at the $65 million dollar renovation of the former Providence Hospital, which houses the Seattle University College of Nursing’s Clinical Performance Lab. The newly renovated and retrofitted building, a project of the Sabey Corporation, reopened as the James Tower Life Sciences Building. Within the new building, 19,000 square feet of space was set aside for the College of Nursing’s Clinical Performance Lab. The state-of-the-art facility houses research labs, classrooms, faculty offices and an exam clinic. The lab is made possible by the Jim and Janet Sinegal Initiative for Nursing Education, which gave the Seattle University College of Nursing $5 million to improve access to quality health care. The new lab seeks to replicate hospital and clinical settings, complete with patient simulators, giving students experience in a setting as close to the real thing as possible.

VISION

A community of scholars, educating nursing leaders committed to service and social justice.

VALUES

We embody the Jesuit values of service to others; a commitment to social justice, and life-long learning. Additionally, our values embrace the global community, humanitarian emphasis, leadership, scholarship, clinical competence and collegiality.

MISSION

Seattle University College of Nursing is a learning community comprised of students, faculty, staff, and health care professionals who support each other in providing quality educational programs and pursuing scholarly
endeavors.

We actively work to assure the provision of quality nursing care to vulnerable and under served populations.

We sustain a dynamic educational process that responds to changes in the health care needs of the community.

We employ creative teaching strategies for the promotion of critical thinking and ethical individual skills and talents.

We seek diversity in our students and faculty and value diversity in our community.

We are committed to the advancement of nursing knowledge through scholarship, research and publication.

We promote nursing leadership by graduating students who are competent and confident in their abilities and who recognize a responsibility to use their Seattle University education for the health and welfare of their communities.

BSN PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

Seattle University College of Nursing has a 67-year history of outstanding baccalaureate education in nursing, with an equally long tradition of community outreach and service. The aim of the College of Nursing is to provide students with the critical thinking tools and educational preparation necessary for professional practice, combined with an emphasis on values and service to others derived from the Jesuit tradition.

BSN PROGRAM INFORMATION

The College of Nursing offers a four-year, bachelor of science in nursing degree (BSN) for undergraduate students with no previous education in nursing. Second-degree learners are also admitted to the program. Graduation from the BSN program combined with personal data screening, makes students eligible for NCLEX (National Council Licensure Examinations) and licensure as a Registered Nurse (RN).




School name:Seattle UniversityCollege of Nursing
Address:901 12th Avenue
Zip & city:WA 98122-1090 Washington
Phone:(206) 296-5660
Web:http://www.seattleu.edu/nurs/
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Visits:
1962  



College of Nursing Nursing School Location







College of Nursing Courses


PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
A conceptual approach to alterations in structure and function resulting from stressors on the human body. Course will review the cellular and molecular basis of these alterations. The course will examine pathophysiologic mechanisms of disease such as infl ammation, genetic alterations, immune responses, and alteration in the functions of body systems.

INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY
Examination of pharmacological principles and drug classes. Self-management strategies and care provider considerations. Integration of legal, ethical, and other social factors.

FOUNDATIONS OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING
Examination of nursing history, nursing theory, and professional practice using systems theory as a framework. Introduction to concepts of health, health promotion and protection in the context of health care delivery systems. Development of critical thinking, cultural competence, communication, collaboration, and group process skills for professional relationships.

HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION I
Basic techniques of screening assessments and health promoting interventions for individuals, families and populations across the lifespan.

HEALTH ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION II
Focus on nursing process and intervention in wellness and illness. Process includes assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of nursing care. Application of nursing interventions across the lifespan of individuals and in communities. Perform basic nurse provider skills.

NURSING RESEARCH AND EPIDEMIOLOGICAL METHODS
Introduction to nursing research as a systematic method of inquiry that is fundamental to evidence-based nursing practice. Examination of qualitative, quantitative, and epidemiological research methods. Application of computer skills to identify and search health care databases. Retrieval and critique of relevant research.

PROMOTING WELLNESS IN FAMILIES – THEORY
Assessment of family structure, function and dynamics. Nursing strategies to promote
health and reduce the risk of illness and injury in families through the lifespan to middle
adulthood.

PROMOTING WELLNESS IN FAMILIES – CLINICAL
Experiences in nursing care of childbearing women and childrearing families and groups. Clinical practice in a variety of acute care and community-based settings. Application of theories, principles, and nursing strategies to promote wellness and reduce illness in families and groups.

PROMOTING WELLNESS FOR OLDER ADULTS – THEORY
Nursing strategies for health promotion and risk reduction in middle and older adulthood. Emphasis on adjustments to the aging process, living with chronic illness, and end of life care.

PROMOTING WELLNESS FOR OLDER ADULTS – CLINICAL
Application of nursing process will focus on common and select biopsychosocial health concerns for older adults. Emphasis on health promotion, risk assessment, and prevention of illness and injury. Clinical experiences will occur in diverse settings appropriate to the older adult population.

PROMOTING MENTAL HEALTH – THEORY
Nursing process application of selected theories from the sciences, humanities, and psychiatric nursing to promote wellness in clients with diverse cultural, developmental, and biopsychosocial problems across multiple healthcare environments.

PROMOTING MENTAL HEALTH – CLINICAL
Experiences applying principles of psychiatric nursing care to promote wellness in clients with diverse cultural, developmental, and psychosocial needs. Clinical experiences will occur in a variety of hospital and community settings.

SOCIAL JUSTICE AND CARING FOR THE VULNERABLE
Concepts and models of vulnerability. Emphasizes social justice, advocacy, and empowerment as framework for providing culturally competent nursing practice.

PROMOTING WELLNESS DURING ALTERED HEALTH I – THEORY
Explore factors contributing to and resulting in: common, acute and chronic physiological alterations in health with integration across the lifespan. Course focuses on nursing process, nursing management, risk reduction, disease prevention, and modifi cation of impact of illness on individuals, families, and populations.

PROMOTING WELLNESS AND ALTERED HEALTH I – PRACTICE
Clinical practice to apply risk reduction, disease prevention and modifi cation, and nursing management to adults with predictable health problems in medical-surgical acute care settings across the lifespan. Impact of alterations in physical and behavioral health applied to families and communities.

STATISTICS FOR HEALTH SCIENCES
Introduction to the nature of measures, descriptive statistics, hypothesis-testing techniques, and critical reading of descriptive and inferential statistics.

ISSUES IN WOMEN’S HEALTH: A WELLNESS PERSPECTIVE
Elective course (not a major requirement). Lifestyle and infl uences on health outcomes. Health promotion and protection practices. Special emphasis on nutrition as it relates to wellness. Examination of health issues and choices for women and families.

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES IN BELIZE
An exploration of the history, culture and health and human service infrastructure of Belize. Students will spend fi ve days working in health and human service setting according to their interest and skill set.

LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH CARE
Explore organizational theories, leadership and management principles in professional nursing practice and in healthcare organizations. Critically examine economic, political, and legal factors as these relate to the delivery of health services.

HEALTH CARE OF COMMUNITIES – THEORY
Application of systems theory, nursing science, public health science and community health theories to a variety of populations and communities. Nursing focus is an integrated approach to common community health problems across the lifespan, from prenatal to elder care, populations, and problem solving to promote healthy communities.

HEALTH CARE IN COMMUNITIES – PRACTICE
Clinical application of concepts, principles, and processes, to support health promotion, risk reduction, disease prevention, and illness management across the lifespan and in populations. Community-based experiences with families, populations, and groups. Nursing students collaborate with other disciplines and community members on health problems and health policy issues, to implement and evaluate community-based projects.

DRUGS AND NURSING IMPLICATIONS: A CASE STUDY APPROACH
Second pharmacology course for nursing majors. Application of knowledge of major drug classes and signifi cant nursing implications. The student will synthesize information learned in previous theory and clinical courses.

PROMOTING WELLNESS DURING ALTERED HEALTH II – THEORY
Continued focus on nursing management, physiological and psychosocial factors infl uencing altered health, and an integrated approach to nursing therapies for promoting wellness during altered health across the lifespan. Emphasis on managing complex care.

PROMOTING WELLNESS DURING ALTERED HEALTH II – PRACTICE
Continued application of nursing process and refi nement of nurse provider competencies. Clinical practice to apply risk reduction, disease prevention and modifi cation, and nursing therapies to manage complex care of children and adults with illnesses in medical-surgical acute care settings. Application of theory to individuals, families and populations in the community.

TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONAL NURSING – PRACTICE
Concentrated clinical practice as well as seminar discussions to appraise issues in professional nursing and leadership and management roles appropriate for the BSN graduate. Integrates program competencies.

THE CHANGING FAMILY
An interdisciplinary seminar study of diverse family structures and the complex ways that society shapes, enables, and inhibits particular family forms. Multicultural aspects of contemporary families in socio-historical context are examined.

STRESS, SURVIVAL, AND ADAPTATION
Elective course. Assess stress responses from multifactor, systems-oriented models through current research and literature. Examine complex cognitive, behavioral, affective, sociocultural, and environmental variables. Practice self-management interventions. Open to non-majors. Meets core interdisciplinary course requirement.

CONTEMPORARY CONCEPTS OF HEALTH AND HEALING
Elective course. Blended science and humanities review of theoretical foundations of health. Current issues include alternative health care, balancing individual responsibility with community needs, environment, and cultural health. Open to non-majors. Requires application of concepts to student’s declared major. Meets core interdisciplinary requirement.

INTRODUCTION TO ALCOHOL AND DRUG ADDICTION
History, scope, physiological, social, psychological, and family aspects of alcohol and other drug problems. Impaired driving. Progression and symptoms of addiction; types of alcoholics. Nature of addictive diseases: causality, treatment, and prevention. Meets core interdisciplinary requirement.

SPIRITUALITY AND NURSING
Addresses the concept of spiritual well-being in individuals and groups. Examines the notion of nursing as vocation, and allows students to explore the spiritual dimensions of the nursing profession. Theoretical examination of spiritual concepts in nursing management of populations.

SENIOR SYNTHESIS
A capstone seminar of refl ection and synthesis of the core and nursing. Integration of the intellectual, professional and personal responsibilities of nursing as a career. Examination of contemporary issues challenging the profession. Meets core requirement.

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