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Umpqua Community College - Nursing Department




Umpqua Community College is one of the most picturesque colleges in the country, nestled between beautiful tree-studded hills and overlooking a large bend in the North Umpqua River. Natural volcanic rock and rustic, cedar shake architecture grace the 14 campus buildings located on a 100-acre plot of land six miles north of Roseburg. Easy access to Interstate 5, exit 129, and mild year-around climate complement the scenic beauty of the campus.

The college was established by a vote of greater Douglas County residents in 1964 and conducted classes in various rented facilities in Roseburg for the first few years. Since its founding as a post-secondary education facility it has grown and changed to meet the diverse needs of the community. More than 15,000 students take one or more classes each year, for a full-time equivalent (FTE) of about 3,000 full-time students.

The college offers a variety of programs in Nursing. The UCC Nursing program is accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission. Over the past 15 years UCC has accumulated a pass percentage of over 95% for Licensed Practical Nurses and about 90% for Registered Nurses on the first try of the state licensing examinations. The college program recently became affiliated with the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education (OCNE) which will make it possible to receive a bachelor's degree in Nursing without leaving the UCC campus.



School name:Umpqua Community College - Nursing Department
Address:P.O. Box 967
Zip & city:OR 97470 Oregon
Phone:(541) 440-4613
Web:http://www.umpqua.cc.or.us/Programs/Nrsg1.htm
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Umpqua Community College - Nursing Department Courses


NURSING ASSISTANT
A 164-hour course designed to provide basic nursing skills for employment as a Certified Nursing Assistant once a student has successfully passed the CNA written and practical examination administered by the Oregon State Board of Nursing. The course consists of 84 hours of classroom instruction, followed by 80 hours of supervised clinical instruction. Course restrictions: Conviction of a felony and/or drug usage or distribution may result in the Oregon State Board of Nursing withdrawing the privilege of writing the Certified Nursing Assistant examination. Prerequisites: A student must be 16 years of age and must take UCC's placement tests and score 30 or more on Reading, Writing and Math.

FOUND OF NRSG-HEALTH PROMOTION
Introduces the learner to the framework of the Oregon Consortium for Nursing Education (OCNE) curriculum. Emphasis is on health promotion across the life span including self-health as well as client health practices. To support self and client health practices, students learn to access and read research literature about healthy aging, healthy lifestyle patterns, risk factors for disease/illness, and interventions to promote health behavior change. Students learn to conduct age-appropriate and culturally sensitive assessments about client health practices and risks, recognizes roles of a multidisciplinary team, give and receive feedback about performance, and use reflective thinking about their practice as nursing students. Screening of healthy school aged children, teaching the family experiencing a normal pregnancy, interventions to prevent substance abuse and motivational interactions with healthy, community-dwelling older adults are exemplars.

FOUND OF NRSG-CHRONIC ILLNESS
Introduces assessment and common interventions (including technical procedures) for clients with chronic illnesses common across the life span in major ethnic groups within Oregon. The client and family's "lived experience of the illness, coupled with clinical practice guidelines and extant research evidence is used to guide clinical judgments in care to the chronically ill. Roles of a multidisciplinary team in care of the chronically ill and legal aspects of delegation are explored. Cultural, ethical, health policy, and health care delivery system issues are explored in the context of the chronic illness care. Case exemplars include children with asthma, adolescent methamphetamine abuse, adult-onset diabetes, and older adults with dimentia.

FOUND OF NRSG-ACUTE CARE
Introduces learners to assessment and common interventions (including relevant technical procedures) for care of patients during an acute episode of disease/illness. Common disease/illness trajectories and clinical practice guidelines and/or standard procedures are considered in relation to their impact on providing culturally sensitive, client-centered care.

ADVANCED NURSING CARE I
This is the second course in the series of RN preparation continuing to focus on the four categories of client needs. Primary attention in this course is clients with R/T, fluid and electrolytes, psychosocial integrity health promotion and maintenance especially high risk maternal child competencies along with anxiety, depression and other DMSI conditions. Integrated throughout the categories are the nursing process, caring, communication and documentation, cultural awareness, self-care and teaching and learning. Evaluation of the student continues within the five nursing roles (provider of care, manager of care, teacher, advocate and member in the profession). Students begin to provide entry level RN care to three or more clients in a variety of settings.

ADVANCED NURSING II
The third course in the series of RN preparation continues to focus on the four categories of client needs. Further attention is directed toward psychosocial GI and GU conditions, child/adolescent/geriatric conditions, and physiologic integrity focusing on advanced cardio-respiratory. Integrated throughout the categories are the nursing process, caring, communication and documentation, cultural awareness, self care and teaching and learning. Evaluation of the student continues in the five roles. Students continue to provide entry-level RN care to clients within a variety of settings.

ADVANCED NURSING CARE III
The final course in the AAS RN curriculum with completion of content in the four categories of client needs. Special attention to coping and adaptation, prevention and detection of diseases, physiological conditions relating to neuro,trauma/shock/emergency care plus infectious diseases and advanced pediatric diseases. Integrated throughout the categories are the nursing process, caring, communication and documentation, cultural awareness, self care and teaching and learning. Evaluation of the student continues in the five roles. Students will assume increasing responsibility and autonomy in the management of complex and complicated clients in a variety of setting. Upon successful completion of this course, as well as, other degree requirements, the student can sit for the licensure exam.

PREP FOR PRACTICE
This course is designed to complete the preparation for the RN entering the workforce. The focus continues to be on client needs with special attention to management of care i.e.: case and resources management, leadership, delegation, supervision and consultation plus continuous quality improvement. This is an online course. F W S

COMM BASED NURSING CARE
This course provides for continuation of concepts, principles and skills necessary to integrate RN level community nursing theories into the four client needs categories. The student will build on content taught in the advanced nursing courses and translate into the care of individuals as they relate to families and groups. Integrated throughout the course are nursing process, caring, communication and documentation, cultural awareness, self care, and teaching and learning. Evaluation utilizes the five roles with emphasis on nursing care in the community. This is an online course.

INTERMEDIATE NURSING CARE
This course is the first in the RN preparation drawing from the four categories of client needs; safe, effective care environment, health promotion and maintenance, psychosocial integrity and physiological integrity while integrating the following concepts and processes: the nursing process, caring, communication and documentation, cultural awareness, self care and teaching and learning. This course will focus on assessment skills, the scope of RN practice, as an individual and as a member of an interdisciplinary team. Plus it addresses content related to clients needs specific to mental health, fluids and electrolytes and sexuality issues. Evaluation of students continues withing the five nursing roles (providerof care, manager of care, teacher, advocate and member of the profession). Students begin to provide entry level care to three or more clients in a variety of settings.

CHRONIC ILLNESS II
This course builds on Foundations of Nursing in Chronic Illness I. The evidence base related to family care giving and symptom management is a major focus and basis for nursing interventions with patients and families. Ethical issues related to advocacy, self-determination, and autonomy are explored. Complex skills associated with symptom management, negotiating in interdisciplinary teams, and the impact of cultural beliefs are included in the context of client and family-centered care. Exemplars include patients with chronic mental illness as well as other chronic conditions and disabilities affecting functional status and family relationships. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. (Can follow Nursing in Acute Care II and End-of-Life). 5 hr. lecture and 12 hours clinical/lab per week.

ACUTE CARE II
This course builds on Nursing in Acute Care I focusing on more complex and/or unstable patient care situations, some of which require strong recognitional skills, rapid decision making, and some which may result in death. The evidence base supporting appropriate focused assessments, and effective, efficient nursing interventions is explored, life span factors, cultural variables, and legal aspects of care frame, the ethical decision-making employed in patient choices for treatment or palliative care within the acute care setting. Case scenarios incorporate prioritizing care needs, delegation and supervision, family and patient teaching for discharge planning. Exemplars include acute psychiatric disorders as well as acute condictions affecting multiple body systems. Includes classroom and clinical learning experiences. (Can follow Nursing in Chronic Illness II and End-of-Life Care). 5 hr. lecture/seminar and 12 hours clinical/lab per week.

SCOPE OF PRACTICE
This course is designed to formalize the clinical judgments, knowledge and skills necessary in safe, registered nurse practice. The preceptorship model provides a context that allows the student to experience the nursing work world in a selected setting, balancing the demands of job and life long learner. Faculty/preceptor/student analysis and reflection throughout the experience provide the student with evaluative criteria against which they can judge their own performance and develop a practice framework. Includes seminar, self-directed study and clinical experience. Required for AAS and eligibilty for RN Licensure.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY I
This course introduces the theoretical background that enables students to provide safe and effective care related to drugs and natural products to persons throughout the lifespan. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions regarding using current, reliable sources of information, monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of drug therapy, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding safe and effective use of drugs and natural products, intervening to increase therapeutic benefits and reduce potential negative effects, and communicating appropporiately with other health professionals regarding drug therapy. Drugs are studied by therapeutic or pharmacological class using an organized framework.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY II
This sequel to Clinical Pharmacology I continues to provide the theoretical background that enables students to provide safe and effective care related to drugs and natural products to persons throughout the lifespan. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions regarding using current, reliable sources of information, monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of drug therapy, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding safe and effective use of drugs and natural products, intervening to increase therapeutic benefits and reduce potential negative effects, and communicating appropriately with other health professionals regarding drug therapy. The course addresses additional classes of drugs and related natural products not contained in Clinical Pharmacology I.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL PROC I
This course introduces pathophysiological processes that contribute to many different disease states across the lifespan and human responses to those processes. Students will learn to make selective clinical decisions regarding using current, reliable sources of pathophysiology information, selecting and interpreting focused assessments based on knowledge of pathophysiological processes, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding pathophysiological processes, and communicating with other health professionals regarding pathophysiological processes.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL PROC II
This sequel to Pathophysiological Processes I continues to explore pathophysiological processes that contribute to disease states across the lifespan and human responses to those processes. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions regarding using current,reliable sources of pathophysiology information, selecting and interpreting focused assessments based on knowledge of pathophysiological processes, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding pathopysiological processes, and communicating with other health professionals regarding pathophysiological processes. The course addresses material not covered in Pathophysiological Processes I.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY III
The 3rd in a series: This course introduces pathophysiological processes that continue to many different disease states across the lifespan and human responses to those processes. Students will learn to make selective clinical decisions regarding using current, reliable sources of pathophysiology information, selecting and interpreting focused assessments based on knowledge of pathophysiological processes, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding pathophysiological processes, and communicating with other health professionals regarding pathophysiological processes.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY III
This sequel to Clinical Pharmacology II continues to provide the theoretical background that enables students to provide safe and effective care related to drugs and natural products to persons throughout the lifespan. Students will learn to make selected clinical decisions regarding using current, reliable sources of information, monitoring and evaluating the effectiveness of drug therapy, teaching persons from diverse populations regarding safe and effective use of drugs and natural products, intervening to increase therapeutic benefits and reduce potential negative effects, and communicating appropriately with other health professionals regarding drug therapy. The course addresses additional classes of drugs and related natural products not contained in Clinical Pharmacology II.

CWE: NURSING
Qualified students work at training sites that provide experience appropriate to their major. These experiences will provide the opportunity for students to gain knowledge of the various tasks performed in their career field. A student may take any number of CWE credits per term, not to exceed 13 credits per year.

IND. STUDY: NURSING
This course provides the opportunity for the student to transition from SN to entry-level RN through a preceptored experience. This course will allow the student to apply their knowledge and skills gained over the course of three terms to the role of manager of care for a group of clients and members of the healthcare team while working with a selected RN preceptor. The role of manager of care incorporates leadership, delegation, priority setting, legal and ethical issues plus an introduction to case management/health care delivery systems. 2 credits = 70 hours.

PHLEBOTOMY
This 11-wk. course will provide students with the basic skills needed to work as phlebotomists. Course work to include basic anatomy and physiology, infection control and safety venipuncture, specimen handling and hands-on training with patients in a clinical setting. Requirements for admission: HS diploma or GED and up-to-date childhood PPD and Hepatitis B immunizations. Obtain a healthcare provider level CPR card prior to the beginning of the clinical experience after the 5th week; and be available early morning hours for clinical experience. Textbook required; available at UCC bookstore. Deferred payments accepted.

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