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Union College (Nursing Program)




The Union College Nursing Program builds on the concept that human beings are created in the image of God who gave them individuality, autonomy, a capacity for intelligent choice and adaptive mechanisms to deal with change. Exercising the right of self-determination, human beings chose a course contrary to the principles that promote well-being, consequently forfeiting health in all dimensions. The goal of the nurse is to assist clients to achieve high-level wellness.

A broad base in the humanities, natural, social and nursing sciences provides the student with a solid foundation required to carry out the mission of the nursing program, which is to prepare students from diverse backgrounds to be competent caring generalists in the profession of nursing. The program is based on professional standards and reflects a commitment to wholeness, Christian service and Seventh-day Adventist values.

MISSION STATEMENT

The Mission of the Union College Nursing Program is to prepare students from diverse backgrounds to be competent, caring generalists in the profession of nursing. The Program is based on professional standards and reflects a commitment to wholeness, Christian service and Seventh-day Adventist Values.

PHILOSOPHY STATEMENT

The Nursing Program subscribes to a philosophy that is based upon Bible principles supplemented by the educational writings of Ellen G. White, one of the founders of the Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Church. Comprehensive in its scope, SDA nursing is unique in its focus on facilitating achievement of Christ’s purpose, “I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly” (John 10:10). The Nursing Program faculty support the specific beliefs of the church concerning health and education of which the following statement is representative:

To restore in man the image of his Maker, to bring him back to the perfection in which he was created, to promote the development of body, mind, and soul, that the divine purpose in His creation might be realized, this was to be the work of redemption. This is the object of education, the great object of life. (White, E.G., Education. Boise, ID: Pacific Press, 1952, pp. 15-16.)

Human Beings: created in the image of God who gave them individuality, autonomy, a capacity for intelligent choice and adaptive mechanisms to deal with change. Exercising this right of self-determination, human beings chose a course contrary to the principles that promote well-being, consequently forfeiting health in all dimensions. Compassionate concern which led our heavenly Father to give His Son to die demonstrates what infinite value He places upon humans. Therefore, high quality health care that promotes wholeness is a right for each individual and should be accessible to all.

Each person is a unique, dynamic, multidimensional composite with physical, mental, social/cultural and spiritual dimensions living within families and communities.

GOALS

At the completion of the Union College Nursing Program, the student has had the opportunity to
* use Christian values as a foundation to provide caring service as modeled by Christ;
* synthesize knowledge acquired from humanities, natural and social sciences and nursing courses, for critical thinking and decision making;
* utilize the nursing process in the care of clients experiencing commonly occurring or multiple and complex stressors at all levels of acuity in diverse environments;
* develop and maintain competence in selection and use of technical, communication and assessment skills in all environments;
* promote client wholeness and high level of wellness in diverse populations within all cultures across the life span;
* function as a provider of care, a designer/manager/coordinator of care and a member of a profession to enhance client care and support the nursing profession;
* advocate for professional standards of practice within diverse environments and within the interdisciplinary health care team;
* evaluate and apply research findings to clinical nursing practice and be prepared for evidence-based practice;
* possess a foundation for advanced study and continued professional development.



School name:Union CollegeNursing Program
Address:3800 South 48th Street, Larson Lifestyle Center, Upper Level
Zip & city:NE 68506 Nebraska
Phone:402.486.2524
Web:http://www.ucollege.edu/ucscripts/public/template/default.asp?DivID=1&pgID=36
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Nursing Program Courses


PHARMACOLOGY
Introduces pharmacologic principles. Examines various drug classifications and general characteristics of drugs within each class, including actions, indications for use, undesirable effects and education for clients.

FUNDAMENTALS
Introduces the roles and responsibilities of the professional nurse in acute care and home health settings. Utilizes the nursing process, emphasizing psycho-motor skills in nursing. Includes basic principles of nursing theory, therapeutic communication, teaching-learning, stress adaptation, wholeness and high-level wellness, and critical thinking. Students use beginning skills/ therapeutics to meet the comfort and safety needs of clients.

MEDICAL-SURGICAL I
Building upon principles from relevant arts and sciences, students use the nursing process in modifying commonly-occurring stressors involving the chronic and acutely-ill client. Students address client problems related to body systems. This course encourages the development of critical thinking in making beginning nursing decisions for client care.

PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT
Develops assessment skills necessary to provide competent care for clients of varying ages and ethnic backgrounds. Students practice skills in data collection, interpretation, health planning and client education. These skills help the student focus on client wholeness and placement on a health continuum for optimum care. Clinical hours are spent with preschool children, school-age children, adults and geriatric clients.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
Examines human pathophysiology, beginning at the cellular level and progressing to integrated systems analysis. An in-depth examination of normal body function is contrasted to physiological dysfunction. Emphasizes the relationship between theory and clinical findings.

MEDICAL-SURGICAL II
Continues to build upon principles from relevant arts and sciences. Students use the nursing process in modifying commonly-occurring stressors involving the chronic and acutely-ill client. Students address client problems related to body systems. This course encourages the development of critical thinking in making nursing decisions for client care.

JUNIOR SEMINAR
Examines the historical as well as the future trends of the nursing profession. Nursing education, image and professional behavior, nursing theorists, and the political process are discussed. One class period per week. Spring semester.
CHILDBEARING FAMILY
Emphasizes the promotion of high-level wellness during the childbearing cycle. Students utilize the nursing process to meet the physical, mental, social-cultural, and spiritual needs of clients, taking into consideration the total family unit. Clinical experiences include care of childbearing families in hospital and community settings.

NURSING RESEARCH (WR)
Focuses on basic research concepts and methodology involved in conducting studies in nursing. Students learn to critique research studies in order to apply findings to clinical nursing practice. The overall focus is a thorough understanding of the scientific method from a Christian perspective.

FRONTIER NURSING
Introduces the nursing student to principles and practices of health care on the frontiers of developing and third world countries, and opportunities for professional practice in these areas throughout the world. Concepts of basic health education, use of natural remedies, prevention of diseases throughout the life cycle are emphasized.

FRONTIER NURSING—FIELD EXPERIENCE
An elective two-week field experience that allows third- or fourth-year nursing students to apply the principles that were learned in NRSG 391 Frontier Nursing. Students have the opportunity, as part of a multidisciplinary healthcare team, to perform village health assessments, provide basic public health education, and assist in providing healthcare to patients in a developing country. The field trip utilizes the Tasba Raya Adventist Clinic in Francia Sirpi, North Atlantic Autonomous Region, Nicaragua. This clinic provides health care to Miskito Indians who reside in this region. A third week may be added to this experience in the future.

CHILDREARING FAMILY
Provides an opportunity to develop awareness of the needs of children and their families at various stages of development. The nursing process is utilized in providing nursing care. Students learn nursing interventions that promote wellness and prevent illness, as well as caring for the ill child and family. The concept of wholeness is considered as it relates to the child and family. Clinical experience is obtained in hospital and community settings. Average of three class hours and six clinical hours per week. Fall semester.

MENTAL HEALTH
Studies thoughts, emotions and behavior, the application of mental health principles and current developments in the mental health field. Students use the nursing process in the psychiatric setting. Clinical experiences provide the students opportunity to develop therapeutic nurse-patient relationships while working with clients experiencing psychosocial stressors. Focus is on the promotion and maintenance of mental health, so that wholeness is facilitated and movement toward optimal health is achieved. Average of three class and six clinical hours per week. Fall semester.

MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP IN HEALTH CARE
Examines the purpose and functions of management, leadership and current organizational styles. Emphasizes understanding human behavior as the basis of management effectiveness. Using critical thinking and decision making, students apply principles of management and leadership to promote high levels of wellness for patients in relation to changing societal and health need sand facilitate the actions of others in the delivery of healthcare. Average of two class and three clinical hours per week.

COMPLEX CARE
Builds upon the previous nursing courses to develop a systematic approach to caring for the client with multiple stressors affecting many systems. Students apply the nursing process to facilitate removal or modification of stressors for persons primarily in the acute care and partially in the community settings. Students address both the critically ill adult with complex problems of body systems as well as legal, ethical and psychosocial aspects of nursing the critically ill adult.

COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING
Focuses on nursing knowledge and skill needed in providing for health care of the community. Student are able to provide care to a variety of individuals, families and groups in the community who are at various positions on the age and health continuum. The focus of care is promotion of health with consideration for all dimensions of wholeness. Students apply the nursing process in the clinical setting and develop awareness and experience with community resources appropriate for community clients.

SENIOR SEMINAR
Focuses on issues which will confront new graduates in the workplace. Discusses licensure, resumes and interviewing, ethical decision making, collective bargaining and legal concerns. Also explores career options and further professional development of nurses.

DISASTER MANAGEMENT
An elective course that explores the concepts and principles of disaster preparedness and management. Covers natural and man-made disasters and acts of terrorism including conventional, biological, chemical, nuclear and radiological mass casualty events. Students explore the roles of the local, state and federal Departments of Health & Human Services, FEMA, CDC and the Department of Homeland Security during disasters and mass casualty events. This course is open to students of any major. Fall semester.

PRECEPTORSHIP
Applies nursing knowledge in a clinical setting of the students' choice, bridging the gap between theory and practice at an entry level position. Preparation for the experience includes analysis of health care delivery systems and roles the students will fill within the system. Joint planning between the student, instructor, preceptor and agency determines the students' activities and experiences. This individualized program is the capstone course for Union College nursing students.

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