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University of Michigan (School of Nursing)




HISTORY

Since 1893, when the first six students graduated from the University Hospital program, the University of Michigan School of Nursing has been visionary in its research agenda and responsive to the health needs of the residents of Michigan and the nation. By 1941, the School of Nursing was fully established as a health sciences academic unit of the University. Today, the School consistently ranks among the top five schools of nursing in the United States providing national and international leadership in research, education and service. Improved nursing practice has been the hallmark of the University of Michigan School of Nursing since the first six students were admitted to the program in 1891. Patient and client care, combined with discovery from learning and research, have distinguished the School's progress to our current placement among the top five schools of nursing in any recognized ranking.

Our faculty preparation is unparalleled. A doctoral degree is required for appointment and 90 per cent of our tenure track faculty members hold earned doctorates. The internationally recognized research conducted by these faculty members is broadly based but is particularly focused on topics that support nursing issues in clinical settings.

The School recognizes that nurses must continue to be challenged educationally in order to meet the rigors of a highly complex diverse profession. The baccalaureate degree is the basis for a career in nursing, but an increasingly complex health care system demands that nurses continue to grow professionally through the pursuit of master's, doctoral, and postdoctoral degrees.

Educational programs available allow the diploma or A.D.N. nurse to complete a B.S.N. degree. There is also a three-year R.N. to M.S. program. Off-campus B.S.N. completion programs are available in Traverse City and Kalamazoo. Generic students are admitted from the Jackson Community College and U-M Dearborn programs at the sophomore level.

At the master's level, many students are working nurses who understand that advanced nursing education is central to improving their skills as clinical specialists and managers. The School has the only certified midwifery program in the State of Michigan.

The School's flagship doctoral program is widely recognized as one of the best in the world. The contributions made to nursing research by doctoral alumni add significantly to the increasing body of research that substantiates and influences nursing practice. Postdoctoral study is available in the areas of health promotion and risk reduction and in neurobehavior.

Over 11,500 alumni from the School have taken their places as leaders in clinical, academic, and various other settings across the United States and around the world.

The University of Michigan School of Nursing proudly celebrated its 100th anniversary in 1991. There are more than ten thousand living alumni of the School of Nursing. Significant among the School's advances was the establishment in 1919 of a five-year program leading to the Bachelor of Letters degree and the Diploma in Nursing. In 1944 this option became the five-year Bachelor of Science degree combining three years of nursing with two years in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts. This distinguished Michigan as one of the first educational institutions to offer nursing students the option of a combined academic and professional course of study. The four-year program leading to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing was established in 1953.

The period from 1961 through 1975 marked the development of graduate education in nursing at the School, beginning with the establishment of the Master of Science degree program in Psychiatric Nursing. In the following years Master of Science degree programs were developed in Medical-Surgical Nursing, Parent-Child Nursing, Nursing Health Services Administration, and Community Health Nursing. The Gerontological Nursing Master's Program, established to meet the health needs of our growing aged population, enrolled its first students in 1987. The master's degree program in Nursing Administration in 1990 started to offer an option of a dual degree with Business Administration. The master's degree program in Nurse-Midwifery also admitted its first students in the fall of 1990. In 1991 an RN to Masters program was established.

A baccalaureate program for registered nurses was first offered on the Ann Arbor campus in 1971. In 1976 the Ann Arbor RN Studies Program was expanded to include the community-based sites of Kalamazoo and Traverse City.

The establishment of the PhD program in nursing in 1975 completed the full range of program offerings for higher education in nursing. This program was one of the first in the USA to offer the PhD degree specifically for nurses. A post-doctoral training program for advanced study in a broad range of nursing phenomena was initiated in 1987.

As part of its commitment to diversity and ensuring a positive supportive climate for all students, the Office of Multicultural Affairs was established in 1984.

B.S.N.

Academic excellence makes a difference. In the Classic Bachelor of Science in Nursing program incoming freshmen and transfer students start right away on a curriculum that balances nursing courses with humanities and social and biological sciences.

Many of your clinical studies will take place at the University of Michigan Medical Center with its excellent nursing staff, one of the largest academic health science centers in the country. And you'll benefit from all the U of M resources and programs that include sophisticated library systems, progressive computer technology, study abroad programs, academic resources, and career planning and placement advice.

All this plus a range of special programs; an extraordinary teaching faculty; and a low student/faculty ratio ensure you an excellent education. You will also be in a position to enter the profession of nursing with superior training and credentials.



School name:University of MichiganSchool of Nursing
Address:400 North Ingalls
Zip & city:MI 48109-5482 Michigan
Phone:(800)458-8689
Web:http://www.nursing.umich.edu/
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School of Nursing Courses


NURSING AS A SOCIETAL INTERPERSONAL PROFESSION
This course explores and introduces the scope of the nursing profession, with emphasis on the societal mandate for nursing, legal parameters of practice, critical thinking and interpersonal relationships and communication. Students will begin to develop the self as nurse. Possible career trajectories will be explored through interaction with faculty mentors and the development of a nursing portfolio.

HEALTH & SOCIAL JUSTICE THROUGH SERVICE-LEARNING
This service-learning course integrates learning experiences around social justice and responsibility with professional responsibilities for civic engagement. Four aspects of social justice are designated as priorities for the service-learning experience: health care disparities; poverty; environmental health; and the medically underserved. Learning experiences consist of didactic sessions, web-based discussions, and service hours in selected community agencies.

HEALTH PROMOTION AND RISK REDUCTION
Theoretical and empirical support for promoting health and reducing risk behaviors is examined as a basis for understanding how individuals can positively influence their own health and wellness and the role of professional nursing in these processes. Using substantive content, exemplar behaviors of nutrition, physical activity and stress management will be examined from the student's perspective to gain an understanding of their contribution to health and wellness. Underlying dynamics, such as self-efficacy and resilience, will be examined in the context of the theoretical and empirical literature. Students will examine potential strategies for influencing health behavior change. Students will participate in a service-learning experience that facilitates their understanding of factors that enhance health promotion and risk reduction behaviors.

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE HUMAN BODY
The purpose of this course is to relate structure and function at the organ system level and demonstrate the contribution of each system to maintenance of homeostasis of the entire body. Physical and chemical principles are used as the basis of explanations, and the organ systems are explored from the cellular level upward. The scientific basis for understanding functional health patterns is emphasized.

DISABILITY ISSUES: FOCUS ON SPINAL CORD INJURY
This course provides an overview of disability issues for spinal cord injury in a variety of populations and age groups. Classroom presentations and dialogue will use current research and policy to discuss the definition and sequelae of spinal cord injury, the rehabilitation process, adjustment issues facing persons with spinal cord injury, and political, social, legal, and economic issues related to spinal cord injury. Both physical changes and the lived experience of spinal cord injury will be discussed. Approaches to prevention will be stressed. Students will also participate in service-learning activities related to prevention and health maintenance for persons with spinal cord injury.

ASSESSMENT OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS THROUGHOUT THE LIFESPAN
This course is designed to provide the student with the beginning knowledge and skills needed to assess the health status and the experience of health and illness of individuals from infancy through old age. It is a companion course to the Maintaining and Restoring Health course, which addresses the fundamental concepts necessary to observe and communicate as a nursing professional. Emphasis is on the assessment of physical, developmental, psychosocial (cognitive, affective, and behavioral), cultural, and spiritual dimensions of the client and/or families, as well as factors that influence behavioral responses to health and illness. State of the art laboratory technologies and diverse laboratory experiences provide opportunities to integrate the knowledge and skills necessary for history taking, physical and psychosocial examination, and documentation, as well as provide the necessary means to translate laboratory skills into meaningful clinical encounters in concurrent clinical courses. Attention will be placed on distinguishing normal from abnormal findings related to the physical examination and judging the functional abilities of the client. The course structure id designed to provide students with the ability to evaluate health related situations from a variety of perspectives (personal, client, and health professional) in order to analyze their impact on responses to health and illness. Students will examine their role within the therapeutic nurse-client relationship as they interact with infants, children, adolescents and their families when providing health and illness care. Students will discuss and analyze their experiences in order to better understand the various meanings patients and providers ascribe to health and illness and how these perceptions impact health care.

PERSPECTIVES IN WOMEN'S HEALTH
This elective course examines women's health issues across the life span from a feminist and socio-political perspective. Attention will be paid to the historical, economic, and political factors that influence the well being of women. Students will gain a greater knowledge of women's bodies and the health/illness issues most relevant to women. A major emphasis will be to educate and empower students to become pro-active within the health care system.

MAINTAINING AND RESTORING HEALTH
This course introduces students to the role of critical reflective thinking and integrates key aspects of the nursing process, therapeutic communication, decision-making, professional nursing behaviors, ethical principles, and basic nursing skills in the provision of nursing care to individuals, families and groups from diverse backgrounds.

BEGINNING CONCEPTS AND INTERVENTIONS IN NURSING
This is the first of the clinical nursing courses. Introduces the student to the nursing process and the techniques necessary to perform interventions basic to professional nursing. Students have the opportunity to utilize interventions and apply concepts and theory to individual clients.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
Mechanisms and theories related to the development of disease and alterations in body function of individuals throughout the life span are presented. Emphasis is placed on common conditions related to functional health patterns. Principles of disease transmission and immunological responses are integrated.

ASSESSMENT OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS
This course is designed to provide the student with the beginning knowledge and skills needed to assess the health status of individuals from infancy through old age. Emphasis is on the assessment of physical, developmental, psychosocial (cognitive, affective, and behavioral), cultural, and spiritual dimensions of the client. Attention will be placed on distinguishing normal from abnormal findings and judging the functional abilities of the client.

TRANSITION TO NURSING
This course is designed to facilitate transition into the study of professional nursing. Emphasis is placed on students gaining an appreciation of the societal context of nursing practice. Nursing's role in promoting and supporting healthy behaviors is examined as an exemplar of a phenomenon of concern to nursing. Theoretical and empirical support for promoting health and reducing risk behaviors is used as the basis for understanding ways that diverse individuals can positively influence their own health and wellness. Foundational skills of effective interpersonal communication and group work are developed through seminar exercises and course assignments. Principles of service learning are introduced.

HEALTH MAINTENANCE AND RESTORATION I
This is the first of two sequential courses to introduce students to the role of critical and reflective thinking as a process to synthesize knowledge and master basic nursing skills needed to promote, maintain and restore health in clients. The course will integrate nursing process, principles of therapeutic communication, decision-making, and basic nursing skills necessary for applying research to the experience of health and illness of individuals, families and groups from diverse ethnic, cultural and geographic backgrounds.

HEALTH MAINTENANCE AND RESTORATION II
This course builds on basic sciences and content introduced in N254: Health Maintenance and Restoration I. Students will have expanded opportunities to use critical and reflective processes to guide decisions to care for clients hospitalized and plan medical and surgical interventions to prepare clients for discharge following hospital care. This course will be framed to integrate content from health assessment, pharmacology, and pathophysiology to the care of clients from diverse ethnic, cultural and geographic backgrounds.

HEALTH ASSESSMENT II
The focus of this course is to assess the experience of health and illness across the lifespan through observations and interactions with individuals, families, groups from culturally diverse populations, and communities; specifically, factors that influence behavioral responses to health and illness. This course builds on the fundamental concepts necessary to observe and communicate as a nursing professional. The course structure is designed to provide the students with the ability to evaluate health related situations from a variety of perspectives (personal, client, and health professional) in order to analyze their impact on responses to health and illness. The culture and belief systems used by individuals, families, and groups to construct personal meanings of health or illness will be examined.

HONORS SEMINAR
The undergraduate nursing honors seminar is an opportunity for honors students to benefit from scholarly enrichment. Seminar meetings, facilitated by an active nurse researcher, will facilitate student-faculty interaction around issues of science, research and policy. Students will develop foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes, essential to future success in scholarly pursuits.

MATERNITY & REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH
Drawing from their educational and life experiences, students will be challenged to think critically about aspects of male and female reproductive health using a continuum of care approach from health promotion through restoration. childbearing, in the context of the developing family, will be the primary focus in both the didactic and clinical components of the course. Students will examine factors influencing conception, pregnancy, and birth (i.e., genetics, therapeutic nutrition, perinatal loss, and fertility). They will discuss the effects that culture, society, technology, and economics have on childbearing and reproductive health. A variety of women's reproductive health issues from menarche to menopause, as well as commonly occurring male reproductive health issues will be included. Students will explore factors influencing expressions of human sexuality in the context of societal norms, gender and age. Students will examine reproductive health issues in the context of immediate (family) environments to more distal (extended/societal) environments.

EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE
The primary goal of this 2-credit core course is to promote an evidence-based approach to nursing practice. Evidence-based findings for nursing practice will be evaluated in terms of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic relevance. An understanding of the research process, applicable theories, organizational dynamics, and leadership functions are applied to the design and process of implementing evidence-based practice in health care settings. Students will complete a group evidence-based practice project.

HEALTH CARE DELIVERY: SYSTEMS AND ISSUES
This is one of two foundational courses for students enrolled in the Registered Nurse Studies program. In this course the students will explore the U.S. health care delivery system, health care economics and the political process and its impact on the health of individuals, families and communities. Within this framework the student will examine the impact of cultural, social and ethnic diversity on the delivery of health care. The student will develop strategies for addressing health care issues utilizing the political process.

DIMENSIONS OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING
This is one of two foundational courses for students enrolled in the Registered Nurse Studies program. Students explore various theoretical perspectives on the nature of professional nursing and the concepts of persons, health and environment. Students also examine the impact of information technology on health. Leadership skills are addressed including career development and various modes of professional communication.

HEALTH AND HEALTH BEHAVIOR IN INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES
In this course, students gain an understanding of the concepts of health, well being and health behaviors and their relationship to the care of clients. Students analyze and evaluate attitudes, beliefs and behavior related to health and illness in individuals and families from birth through death. Students will use effective technology for assessment and planning strategies to promote health and minimize risk. Students will examine and use multiple strategies for influencing health behavior change and facilitating client participation.

ACUTE CARE OF PATIENTS AND FAMILIES ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
This course provides theoretical perspective, evidence-based nursing knowledge, and critical thinking experiences basic to providing research-based nursing care directed towards promoting, maintaining, and restoring health in or providing end-of-life care for patients and families across the lifespan. Clinical and didactic components of care will address relevant contextual and environmental issues for infants, children, adolescents and young, middle, and older adults. Course content will build on foundational knowledge from basic and social sciences, humanities, pharmacology, as well as previous clinical courses. The course concepts, environment, health and illness, family and self, developmental processes across the lifespan, therapeutic nutrition, communication, and genetics will be integrated by students. Emphasis will be on the acquisition and integration of evidence, knowledge and skills basic to identifying biological, physiological psychological, sociological and environmental interactions that disrupt or enhance health or functional wellness in infants through older adults within the context of family systems. Such efforts will lead to analysis of the multiple variables necessary to develop nursing diagnoses and develop evidence-based nursing care strategies for individuals and families across the lifespan who are under threat of or are experiencing acute and acute on chronic health alterations. Along with the patient and family issues, the student will examine the influence they themselves exert on the therapeutic relationship when providing health and illness care. System issues including legal, ethical, and information technologies will also be examined as an integral part of delivering care.

CHILDBEARING AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH
Students will be challenged to think critically about aspects of male and female reproductive health using a continuum of care approach from health promotion through restoration. Childbearing, in the context of the developing family, will be the primary focus in both the didactic and clinical components of the course. Students will examine factors influencing conception, pregnancy, and birth (i.e., genetics, therapeutic nutrition, perinatal loss, and infertility). They will discuss the effects that culture, society, technology, and economics have on childbearing and reproductive health. A variety of women's health issues from menarche to menopause, as well as commonly occurring male reproductive health issues will be included. We will explore factors influencing expressions of human sexuality in the context of gender and age. Students will examine reproductive health issues in the context of immediate (family) environments to more distal (extended/societal) environments.

INFANT, CHILD AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH AND ILLNESS
This nursing care course focuses on infants', children's, and adolescents' health and illness within the context of their families and relevant environments. It includes didactic and clinical practicum components. Students will be challenged to think and respond critically and comprehensively regarding a variety of infant, child, and adolescent health and illness situations from health promotion through end of life care. Course content will build on foundational knowledge from the basic and social sciences, humanities, and previous clinical courses. Students will integrate physical/emotional/cognitive growth and development, pharmacodynamic, sociocultural, personal, communication, and nutritional differences in order to assess and analyze data, develop nursing care strategies, and evaluate outcomes regarding a variety of health and illness situations throughout infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Along with this, students will examine the influences they themselves exert on infants, children, adolescents, and their families when providing health and illness care. Students will also examine the impact of, and respond effectively to, the health care system and personnel, including legal, ethical, and advanced informational and monitoring technologies when delivering health and illness care to infants, children, and adolescents.

HEALTH AND ILLNESS IN YOUNG, MIDDLE AND OLDER ADULTS
This course provides theoretical perspective, evidence-based nursing knowledge, and critical thinking in experiences basic to providing research-based nursing care directed towards promoting, maintaining, and restoring health in or providing end-of-life care for young, middle, and older adults. The course uses the concepts of Environment, Health and Illness, Family and Self, Development Processes, Therapeutic Nutrition, Ethics, Genetics and Nursing to assist students to prevent illness and restore and maintain wellness in acutely and chronically ill young, middle, and older adults. Emphasis is on the acquisition and integration of evidence, knowledge and skills basic to identifying biological, physiological, psychological, sociological and/or environmental interactions that disrupt or enhance health or functional wellness in young, middle, and older individuals within the context of the family system. Students will be asked to consider multiple variables from varied sources as well as health policy information, in identifying nursing diagnoses and planning evidence-based interventions for young, adult, and older individuals under threat of or with acute and chronic health alterations.

INTRODUCTION TO THE RESEARCH APPROACH IN NURSING
Building on earlier content in critical thinking and the scientific process, this course will expand students' knowledge by providing an introduction to the research methodology essential to providing evidence based nursing care. Students will develop the knowledge and skills crucial to extrapolating evidence, including up to date electronic resources, from nursing and related sciences to research-based nursing care. Students will acquire the basic competencies necessary to read, evaluate and interpret findings of nursing research studies. They will also begin to explore ways to incorporate research findings into professional nursing practice; students will be expected to continue to refine their competencies in later courses as they utilize research findings in specific clinical applications. Thus, consistent with professional standards, students will become consumers of research who critically evaluate and base their nursing care on evidence.

MENTAL HEALTH AND ILLNESS ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
In this course, students will examine the constructs of mental health and mental illness. They will analyze factors that contribute to the development, expression, and course of mental illness, including genetics, brain functioning, developmental level, self, relatedness, and social and physical environments. Students will examine factors that modify behavior, cognition, and emotion and promote restoration of health and functioning. They will conduct psychosocial assessments, develop evidence-based nursing prevention and intervention strategies, and evaluate achievement of outcomes for individuals, families, and groups across the lifespan. Students will also examine systems in which mental health care is provided and the availability of relevant resources. Ethical and legal concerns will be integrated throughout the course. There will be opportunities for students to engage with different teaching modalities, including web-based, case study, group work, and didactic presentations. Clinical experiences will take place in a variety of institutional and community settings.

HONORS DIRECTED RESEARCH
The undergraduate nursing honors directed research course is an opportunity for honors students to benefit from close mentorship by a faculty member actively engaged in nursing research. Honors students will join the faculty's research team and become a contributing member.

NURSING CARE OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES WITH COMPLEX NEEDS
Outcome-based clinical nursing care for individuals (adults and children) and families with complex (multifaceted biological, psychological, and social) health care needs is the focus of this course. Specific emphasis will be placed on the critical assessment of patients across the lifespan and the complex context within which care is provided. Therapeutic strategies and state of the art technology to restore, maintain, and promote health or facilitate a peaceful death drawn from basic and clinical sciences, evidence based research, and other relevant sources (patient, family, cultural mores, etc.) will be stressed. These same sources will be used to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of nursing interventions. Theories, concepts and practices related to lifespan development, genetics, family care, racial-ethnic and cultural issues serve as foundational material for evaluating the success of clinical outcomes. Provision of just and equitable care regardless of personal or social circumstance will be emphasized. Selected clinical experiences aimed at mastering critical reasoning, communication, collaboration and necessary clinical skills will be provided. Clinical experiences will occur across the life span and within diverse contexts and will emphasize the delivery of holistic nursing care to individuals and families with complex health care needs.

EXTERNSHIP IN NURSING CARE OF THE CRITICALLY ILL. SENIOR STANDING
This course is designed to give the student the opportunity to apply the nursing process to meet the bio-psycho-social needs of the patient in acute crisis. The course consists of ten weeks of concentrated study in a selected intensive care unit under the direction of a staff nurse preceptor. Emphasis is placed on: 1) acquisition of physical assessment skills as they apply to the critically ill; 2) establishing nursing diagnoses; 3) identifying nursing interventions utilized to manage problems common to the critically ill; 4) setting priorities for implementation of care; 5) evaluation of the effectiveness or selected nursing interventions; and 6) analysis of the impact of stress produced by the acute crisis on the patient and his/her family members.

NURSING PRACTICE AND HEALTH CARE DELIVERY IN THE UNITED STATES
This course provides an examination of current nursing concepts and trends in the U.S. It is presented within the context of the broader U.S. health care delivery system. Topics include organizational aspects of health care delivery and Nursing's role as a major provider of health care services. Trends in clinical practice areas are examined as are emerging nursing roles. In addition to the classroom, students will have field experiences observing nursing practice in relevant community-based, ambulatory, and impatient settings. The course is designed for international students enrolled in a nursing education program outside the U.S. May also be taken for elective credit by qualified nursing students in programs in the U.S., or be interested practicing nurses.

CRITICAL CARE-CRITICAL INCIDENT MANAGEMENT
This seminar course focuses on selected critical care nursing competences that are essential, frequently occurring, and involve patient safety across various types of pediatric and adult intensive care units. These will build on previously learned nursing competencies. Critical thinking will be the primary process used as it is applied to selected critical incidents through discussions, progressive case studies, and skill demonstrations. The conceptual model of Client-Health-Environment will be the basis for assessing patients and their interface with the technology used for monitoring them, as well as the interface with their bedside environments. The concepts of patient resiliency, vulnerability, stability; surveillance and vigilance; safety; predictability; and patient participation in care will be discussed. These will be analyzed as they contribute to the nursing competencies of recognition of clinical symptoms and their progression, clinical decision making and prioritization, patient advocacy, and maintaining best practice standards. Technological competence as a caring activity and the occurrence of unintended consequences will be covered. Distinctions in anatomy and physiology between children and adults will be addressed when needed for understanding differences in clinical management.

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