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Yale University (School of Nursing)




Established in 1923, the Yale School of Nursing was the first School of Nursing to be based in a university. Since that time, the School has enjoyed a national and international reputation for excellence in education, research, and clinical practice. Our graduates have gone on to assume positions of leadership around the world. The School's educational programs are consistently ranked in the top 10 for clinical education, and the School ranks sixth in funding from the National Institutes of Health to nursing schools for research. The research-intensive environment of Yale University, with its full range of academic disciplines, provides an exceptional environment for advanced study in nursing.

MISSION STATEMENT

The ultimate mission of the Yale School of Nursing is to contribute to better health care for all people. Through the systematic study of the nature and effect of nursing practice, students are prepared to become effective nurse clinicians and nurse scholars capable of improving practice through sound clinical judgment, scholarship and research.

In this endeavor, we are mindful not only of our privilege and freedom as educators in this resource-filled private university, but also our responsibility and accountability with colleagues to consumers. The former allows us to be creative in our thinking and innovative in our practice, while the latter demands a commitment to implementation and a realism in our problem solving.

To accomplish our mission, it is necessary to provide settings for learning in which students may see the contributions of modern nursing to improving the quality of health care for all people through expert practice, research, and health policy. To develop patient-centered nurse clinicians/scholars, we must seek educational and clinical sites that provide an interdisciplinary setting where learning occurs in the context of delivering care that is organized around the patients' needs.

To assure that commitment to better health care for all people is met, it is necessary that our belief in a multi-racial, multi-cultural, non-sexist society be made operational. This requires learning environments where the approach to both patients and students is based on reason and respect for individual differences and free from bias and stereotypes. It is our responsibility to shape the design of health care and education systems, working with consumers and colleagues in the belief that improving patient care improves education and, likewise, improving education improves patient care.

Recognizing that this is a time of transition for nursing and for health care delivery, it will be necessary for the School to make serious obligation of faculty and administrative time and effort to affect consumers' and colleagues' acceptance of the changed capabilities of the profession. This must be done with equal dedication to the character of University life--scholarship in clinical service, building the bases in theory and research on which current and future education and practice depend.

ACADEMICS

The Yale School of Nursing has always been committed to the confluence of research, practice, and education. The faculty believes in practicing what it teaches, and teaching what it practices. As a result, students work alongside clinically active faculty members, senior nurse researchers, and experts in health care policy. The array of faculty expertise is vital to the accomplishment of the School's mission and curricular goals. This approach is unique among programs in graduate education in nursing.

The Yale School of Nursing is a vibrant, exhilarating, and rigorous place to study nursing at the graduate level. Students from diverse backgrounds meet in an environment that nurtures an appreciation for high standards and the pursuit of excellence in nursing practice.

The School offers a master's program with nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nurse-midwifery and nursing management, policy and leadership specialties. Students may enter the master's program with or without previous education in nursing. The Graduate Entry Prespecialty in Nursing (GEPN) is designed to provide graduate-level nursing education for those who hold baccalaureate degrees, but who have no previous nursing education. The GEPN is three years in length. Students who currently hold a license as a registered nurse can complete their master's education in two years. For further information see Clinical Specialties.

Post master's certification is available in six areas: acute care nurse practitioner, adult nurse practitioner, gerontological nurse practitioner, pediatric nurse practitioner, oncology nurse practitioner, and psychiatric-mental health. Application and curricular specifics for each offering are found below under Post Master's Certificates.

We launched our Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing program in the Fall of 2006 to replace the Doctor of Nursing Science Program, which was founded in 1994. The PhD program builds on our strengths in research, scholarship, clinical practice and education by catalyzing the interplay of concepts among these realms to develop the next generation of leaders engaging in Nursing policy and practice. The doctoral program should be completed in four to five years of full-time study.



School name:Yale UniversitySchool of Nursing
Address:P.O. Box 9740
Zip & city:CT 06536-0740 Connecticut
Phone:203.737.1793
Web:http://nursing.yale.edu/
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School of Nursing Courses


ISSUES IN NURSING
The exploration of selected personal and professional issues affecting the ability of a nurse to deliver professional nursing care. Content includes the history of nursing, as well as ethical, legal, cultural, and other policy-related aspects of nursing practice.

BIOMEDICAL FOUNDATIONS OF HEALTH AND DISEASE
This course is offered in the fall/spring terms of the first GEPN year. Lectures focus on the basic scientific principles of physiology and include an introduction to pathophysiology. Anatomical, biochemical, and developmental features are involved in discussion of the inseparable structural-functional relations within the human body. Topics include physiology, biochemistry, immunology, genetics, introductory embryology, and microbiology. In addition, the course addresses topics introduced in 516a and 517a, Medical-Surgical Nursing. Required course for all students in the prespecialty year. W. Zawalich.

SEMINAR IN PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
Didactic sessions focus on the synthesis and application of concepts related to pathophysiology and the treatment of disease. Required for all students in the prespecialty year. Two hours per week. W. Zawalich and guest faculty.

NUTRITION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE
This course provides instruction in those aspects of nutrition fundamental to clinical practice, and the care and counseling of patients. Included are lectures and discussions on diet and health promotion, chronic diseases, weight regulation, eating disorders, pregnancy and early development, and more. The course also addresses behavior modification and effective counseling techniques, and the determinants of human dietary behavior. The population and planetary impacts of nutrition are considered, including malnutrition, nutritional excess, nutrition programs and policies, and resource utilization.

INTRODUCTION TO DRUG THERAPY
This lecture course focuses on the appropriate clinical use of drugs. Emphasis is placed on pharmacology, side effects, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, and the therapeutic use of medications.

FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN ANATOMY
The effective assessment, diagnosis, and management of disease depend on knowledge of the structures of human beings. This introductory course reviews and discusses the structure and function of the major body systems. The aim of this course is to provide clinically relevant anatomical information that will form the basis of clinical reasoning in the coming months. Attempts are made to correlate anatomical knowledge with clinical presentation both in the classroom and in the laboratory.

CLINICAL PRACTICE IN COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING
Community health nurses provide preventive, therapeutic, rehabilitation and hospice services. The clinical experience focuses on the delivery of these health services in domestic community organizations. Nursing responsibility for caseload management offers an opportunity to interact with other members of the interdisciplinary health care team. A community-as-partner assessment and diagnosis project, which culminates in identification of a community health problem and potential solutions, augments core clinical practice. All students are required to present their community projects at a poster session in at the beginning of the following fall semester. In addition, students at remote sites will meet with the course coordinator at a time to be announced in the fall of the following semester. Students accepted for international experiences will complete these during the last four weeks of the term.

SEMINAR IN COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING AND PUBLIC HEALTH
Sessions explore the multidisciplinary theoretical foundations that are the basis for community health nursing practice. Topics include history of community health nursing and public health science; structure and function of federal, state, and local health organizations; funding mechanisms for community health care; epidemiological and biostatistical indicators of community health; methods of family and community analyses.

CLINICAL PRACTICE IN MATERNAL-NEWBORN NURSING
This course focuses on clinical practice essential to nursing care of childbearing families. Clinical settings include hospital and ambulatory care. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.

SEMINAR IN MATERNAL-NEWBORN NURSING
This course presents theory essential to the provision of nursing care of childbearing families. Application of the nursing process as it relates to the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health is emphasized.

CLINICAL PRACTICE IN MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING
This course focuses on the scientific principles, psychomotor techniques, and communication skills fundamental to nursing practice. Sociocultural variations influencing patient care are introduced. Faculty guide small groups of students in individually planned clinical experiences that provide opportunities to use the nursing process in caring for the hospitalized adult with selected pathophysiological problems. Experience also includes weekly clinical conferences and selected observational experiences. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.

SEMINAR IN MEDICAL-SURGICAL NURSING
This course focuses on the dynamic relationship between physical and psychosocial responses to pathophysiological problems occurring in the hospitalized adult. Application of the nursing process as it relates to the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health is emphasized.

CLINICAL PRACTICE IN PEDIATRIC NURSING
Utilizing a family-centered approach, this course provides clinical experience in identifying and assessing children’s physiological and developmental needs, and planning, implementing, and evaluating a plan of nursing care to meet the needs of a particular child and his/her family in health care settings. Students have opportunities to use principles of growth and development, knowledge of the child’s physical and emotional responses to illness, and principles of pediatric medicine and surgery in caring for children and their families. The student gains skill and knowledge in the nursing role and an appreciation for using research findings in practice. Collaboration with other health professionals is emphasized. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.

SEMINAR IN PEDIATRIC NURSING
This course focuses on children’s responses to health and illness. Emphasis is placed on growth and development, health and wellness promotion, and the adaptations of children and their families to illness. Application of the nursing process as it relates to the promotion, maintenance, and restoration of health is emphasized.

CLINICAL PRACTICE IN PSYCHIATRIC–MENTAL HEALTH NURSING
The overall goal of this course in combination with Seminar in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing is to introduce students to the theory and practice of psychiatric nursing in order to facilitate an understanding of abnormal behavior and the nursing care of patients with this behavior. The course focuses on understanding psychiatric disorders and changes in patient behavior over a period of time, assessing symptoms and functional ability of psychiatric patients, using oneself therapeutically in nurse-patient interactions, and appreciating the contributions of other disciplines to patient care and management. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.

SEMINAR IN PSYCHIATRIC–MENTAL HEALTH NURSING
In combination with Clinical Practice in Psychiatric–Mental Health Nursing, this seminar provides students with the foundations of psychopathology within the framework of mental health and mental illness. Biopsychosocial theories of human behavior are presented as they relate to function, alteration, and/or disruption of mental processes. Content includes the assessment, theoretical explanation, and treatment of symptoms directly related to patient behavior. Current knowledge related to nursing care, psychiatric treatment, and psychosocial rehabilitation of identified mentally ill adults and various cultural and social aspects of mental illness is emphasized.

RESEARCH METHODS FOR CLINICAL NURSING RESEARCH.
This yearlong course in research methods provides the student with the basic skills and knowledge to evaluate research and to develop research plans. Topics include purposes and types of research, study designs, sampling, measurement, and data collection strategies. Seminars in the spring term provide the student with exposure to the process of identifying clinical research problems, critically reviewing pertinent literature, and formulating a scholarly praxis prospectus. Required in the first year of specialization. Two hours per week in the fall term and one hour per week in the spring term.

STATISTICS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT, POLICY, AND LEADERSHIP
This course provides students with an introduction to statistical techniques most commonly used in the areas of nursing management and policy. Both descriptive and inferential statistics are addressed. The first part of the course focuses on descriptive and simple bivariate statistics—including measures of central tendency, frequency distributions, t-tests, ANOVA, and chi-square tests—whereby students actively apply the techniques to data. The second part of the course focuses on conceptualization of more complex multivariate statistical tests (linear, logistic, and Poisson regression, and repeated measures analyses). Throughout the course emphasis is on the interpretation and evaluation of statistical tests within the context of published articles in order to maximize evidence-based practice. This is intended to be an introductory course for nurses, and accessible to individuals with little or no prior exposure to statistics. This course is required of all students in the Nursing Management, Policy, and Leadership Specialty; open to others with permission of the instructor.

STATISTICS FOR CLINICAL NURSING RESEARCH
This course presents the descriptive and inferential techniques most commonly used in nursing studies. The emphasis is on the conceptualization of the technique and the ability to select the appropriate technique to answer a research question or test a hypothesis. Computational skills are presented where appropriate in order to have a basic understanding of a given technique. The course also offers an introduction to computer analysis of data. Lectures, data analysis assignments, and examinations. Required in the first year of specialization. Three hours per week. M. Funk.

ADVANCED PATHOPHYSIOLOGY
This course provides students with advanced physiologic and pathophysiologic concepts central to understanding maintenance of health and the prevention and management of disease across the life span. Content on cellular function, genetics, immunology, inflammation, infection, and stress and adaptation provides the framework on which further specialty content knowledge is built. Current research, case studies, and application to advanced nursing practice are highlighted.

CLINICAL APPLICATIONS FOR ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT
This course provides the adult, family, gerontological, psychiatric–primary care, and women’s health nurse practitioner student the opportunity to explore and apply skills obtained in Advanced Health Assessment across the Life Span. Through direct patient interaction, the student hones health history and physical exam skills and develops critical thinking utilizing clinical decision-making skills necessary to provide competent and safe patient care. S. Molony.

ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN
This course is designed to cover the comprehensive history-taking and advanced physical examination requisite of advanced nursing practice/midwifery. Through lecture and laboratory sessions, students learn evidence-based assessment techniques, culturally responsive assessment data collection, application of appropriate technology in health assessment and practice comprehensive health histories and physical examinations on each other and/or in the simulation laboratory. Normal and abnormal variations across the life span are presented.

COMMON HEALTH PROBLEMS OF THE OLDER ADULT
This didactic course focuses on health promotion, disease and disability prevention, and the differential diagnosis and management of common health problems in the gerontological client across acute care, long-term care, and primary care settings. Additionally, the role of the gerontological nurse practitioner in the comprehensive management of chronic illness is explored. Required for all gerontological nurse practitioner, adult/gerontological practitioner, and post master’s gerontological nurse practitioner students.

CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR ADULT, FAMILY, WOMEN’S HEALTH, GERONTOLOGICAL, AND ONCOLOGY NURSE PRACTITIONERS
Course content includes clinical practice in health assessment and the provision of primary and focused health care. Students meet weekly for a one-and-one-half-hour clinical conference that is held concurrently with clinical practice. Clinical conference serves as a forum for students to present and discuss cases and explore issues encountered in clinical practice. This course is required for students in the first year of specialization as adult, family, gerontological, adult/ gerontological, women’s health, and oncology nurse practitioners and is open to psychiatric–primary care track students with permission of the instructor.

PRIMARY CARE PROBLEMS OF ADULTS I
This is the first term of four didactic courses designed to enable students to develop the necessary knowledge base and problem-solving skills for primary care practice as nurse practitioners. The first half of the course focuses on health promotion and disease prevention concepts and strategies. The second half of the course focuses on the diagnosis and management of common health problems seen in primary care.

PRIMARY CARE PROBLEMS OF ADULTS I
This course is a continuation of Primary Care Problems of Adults I and the second of four didactic courses structured to enable students to gain the problem-solving and clinical strategies necessary for primary care practice as nurse practitioners. Classes focus on health promotion, disease prevention, differential diagnosis, and management of common health problems in adults and adolescents.

ADULT DEVELOPMENT: A LIFE SPAN PERSPECTIVE
Human development from adolescence through late adulthood is considered by applying theoretical perspectives to selected examples from literature and life experience. Seminars focus on developmental theory and its application to developmental transitions and alterations in health during adolescence and adulthood.

HEALTH POLICY AND POLITICS
This course provides students with in-depth knowledge of the politics of American health policy, focusing on access to, cost of, and quality of health care. The underlying assumption is that understanding the politics of policy making enables nurses and others to participate effectively in the health policy process, improve the health care delivery system, and thereby contribute to enhancement of patient outcomes. The course covers major concepts of health policy, nursing advocacy, and the policy process, with an emphasis on legislative and regulatory issues, health care financing, managed care, covering the uninsured, and legal issues affecting nursing practice. Students apply their knowledge of these topics to in-depth analysis of an issue related to their practice. Required for all students in the nursing management, policy, and leadership specialty; available to others with permission of the instructor.

CLINICAL PRACTICE IN WOMEN’S HEALTH CARE
The focus of this practicum is management of gynecologic health care needs for women within the context of their lives, approached from the clinical perspective. This course concentrates on the application of physiologic, developmental, psychosocial, and cultural theories to clinical decision making, focusing on family planning and gynecologic health issues for women. Required for all women’s health nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. Eight hours per week of practice required. Didactic and clinical conference two hours weekly.

QUALITY IMPROVEMENT AND PATIENT SAFETY
This course provides the student with a comprehensive understanding of the field of patient safety and its relationship to overall improvement in the quality of health care. The course explores principles of creating and leading a high-reliability health care system focused on patient safety. A particular emphasis is placed on leadership characteristics essential to creating and sustaining a culture of safety within the health care organization.

USES OF DATA IN DECISION MAKING
This course provides content needed to understand, access, mine, and create data for clinical, operational, and financial decision making. Lectures, workshops, and remote access assignments form the basis for learning data elements and structures of administrative databases, data analytic strategies, and the relationship between data and decision making. Combination of four on-site sessions with online teaching; total equivalent to thirty class hours.

PRINCIPLES AND ANALYSIS OF HEALTH CARE ETHICS
Students are introduced to two major theories of health care ethics: (1) principlism, including respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice, and (2) the ethics of care. The ethical theories are applied to clinical cases and health policy analysis through online discussion. Students learn to analyze clinical cases and policy by discerning pertinent facts, discerning distinctions, assessing social context and values, assessing decision-making procedure determining lines of authority, and defining specific questions. The ethical theories and methods are then applied to selected current issues in health care including end-of-life care, resource allocation, noncompliance, and privacy.

CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN HEALTH CARE
This two-day workshop/seminar focuses on the concepts of culture and ethnicity and their effect on health beliefs and practices within the context of health care delivery. Diversity, vulnerability, and health disparities are also examined in relation to culture and ethnicity. Cultural assessments of individual health care providers and health care systems are presented and cultural competency defined and described. The Office of Minority Health National Standards for Cultural and Linguistically Appropriate Services provides the criterion for cultural competency.

HEALTH CARE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
This course provides students with an introduction to accounting and finance and has been designed to provide a broad managerial overview of these topics within the context of nursing. Through both online exercises and problem sets, accounting and finance theories and tools are applied to common decision-making situations experienced by nurse managers. This is intended to be an introductory course for nurses and accessible to individuals with no prior exposure to accounting or finance.

INTRODUCTORY CLINICAL PRACTICE FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT, POLICY, AND LEADERSHIP
This course is designed to provide future nurse leaders with clinical experience designed to synthesize and apply theory and principles from the didactic portion of 579b. With an emphasis on quality improvement and patient safety in health care delivery and policy settings, students engage in projects to implement evidence-based practices in health care delivery and develop a foundation for leadership practice. Individually modified course objectives, supervised experiences, Web-based discussion boards, and written clinical logs are methods used to facilitate learning. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.

RESEARCH METHODS FOR NMPL
The purpose of this course is to provide future nurse leaders with a toolkit of effective, scientifically supported strategies for improving the quality of health care. With an emphasis on quality improvement and patient safety in health care delivery and policy settings, students evaluate the quality of scientific evidence available to support selection and use of nursing and management practices, develop effective strategies to translate evidence into practice, and apply evidence to health policies in public and private sectors.

WELL WOMAN CARE AND GYNECOLOGY
This course focuses on the provision of reproductive-based health care to non-pregnant women across the life span. Through regularly scheduled lectures, seminars, clinical conferences, and supervised clinical practice, students learn and apply principles of primary care, contraception, and office gynecology. The clinical component of this course begins the fourth week of the term.

INTRODUCTION TO ANTEPARTUM CARE
Students are introduced to nurse-midwifery practice. This course is devoted to the theory and practice of antepartum care and fetal assessment. Students apply learning in supervised clinical practice.

PROFESSIONAL ISSUES AND LEADERSHIP
This course is an introduction to the profession of nurse-midwifery and midwifery; to the national professional organization, the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM); and to public policy and programs affecting the health care of women, mothers, and infants. Students review the history of the profession and gain a working knowledge of practice development, coding, insurance issues, risk management, quality assurance, and peer review; clinical ethics; midwifery research, and nurse-midwifery evaluation and effectiveness literature; the structure and function of the ACNM, ACNM documents, and credentialing; the nurse-midwifery role, its functions, leadership, policy development, and interdisciplinary team relationships; Title V and other programs that affect the health care of women and infants, their current legislative base, and implementation as public policy; and international midwifery and the Safe Motherhood Initiative. Discussion focuses on current issues, trends, and possible future directions for women and maternal-infant health care policy and programs, and for the profession. The course prepares students to participate knowledgeably in local, regional, national, and international midwifery meetings and activities of the ACNM, in legislative and policy initiatives for health care of women and others and infants, and to accept responsibility inherent in the profession.

INTRODUCTION TO INTRAPARTUM CARE
The course is devoted to introducing theory, skills, and management of intrapartum, postpartum, and transitional care of the newborn through lecture, case studies, and supervised clinical practice. Students have clinical experience in labor, birth, and postpartum care, as well as in the transitional care of the normal newborn.

NURSE-MIDWIFERY PRIMARY CARE
This course introduces nurse-midwifery students to the concepts of health promotion and screening, as well as to the primary care management of selected common health conditions affecting women.

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF COMMON ADULT CLINICAL PROBLEMS I
This course provides a basis for predicting vulnerability for common clinical problems (cardiovascular, respiratory, hematologic, and immunologic) that occur as a result of illness or outcome of treatment. Assessment, management, and evaluation are emphasized. Normal physiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological management of these conditions are included.

ASSESSMENT OF THE ACUTELY AND CRITICALLY ILL CLIENT.
This course provides comprehensive content necessary in the assessment of the acutely or critically ill patient. Emphasis is on examination of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, based on complex interpretations from laboratory and technical findings. The electrocardiographic (ECG) components of the course may be taken as an elective by students in any specialty who have an interest in ECG interpretation.

ADVANCED ASSESSMENT
Practicum concentrates on development of a systematic methodology of identifying patients’ needs for health care. History taking, physical examination, diagnostic studies and interpretation, analysis of medical and nursing diagnoses, and documentation form the basis of this first clinical course. Selected clinical problems of patients in the acute care setting are studied in the context of case conferences. Physical diagnosis rounds with physician or nurse practitioner preceptorship are included.

CONCEPTUAL BASIS OF NURSING PRACTICE
Through the discussion of concepts and theories in nursing and other disciplines, this course facilitates formation of a conceptual basis for advancing knowledge and practice. Required for all adult advanced practice nursing clinical nurse specialist, acute care nurse practitioner, and oncology nurse practitioner students in the first year of specialization. One and one-half hours per week. T. Knobf.

ADVANCED SPECIALTY PRACTICUM I
This practicum provides students with direct care experience with their special population (acute care, cardiovascular, oncology). The focus of the practicum is on assessment and subsequent management of selected problems for a caseload of patients in acute, ambulatory, and/or long-term settings. During clinical conferences students present cases, formulate clinical diagnoses, and discuss management strategies for patients within their elected special population.

PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF ONCOLOGY
This course provides comprehensive core content focusing on concepts of illness, health-promotion, and decision making. Emphasis is on assessment, diagnosis, and management of common clinical problems. Diagnosis and management of these common clinical problems are examined within the context of the acute, ambulatory, and/or long-term setting.

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